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We will send regular newsletters to our members who have signed up for receiving it during the registration. In 'mymerhaba' newsletter, our editorial staff provides updates, with regard to any information related to places worth visiting, viewing, or otherwise worth knowing, for those who care to know more....

A Mediterranean Adventure

by Fred Moore - December 2008.

Today we’re off to Cyprus to celebrate our 27th wedding anniversary. We make our way to the Adana airport to catch an Atlas Air flight to Ercan Airport near Lefkosa, (Nicosia) Cyprus. The flight is just over forty minutes; the plane is completely jammed with passengers. We’re served a cheese sandwich and juice as we cruise high over the Mediterranean Sea. We touch down at Ercan in the dark and minutes later pull to a stop in front of the terminal. We descend the flight stairs and proceed to passport control for foreign passengers.

That was fairly painless; now to find our bags and look for our transportation to the hotel. It’s always curious to me how people jam themselves shoulder to shoulder up against the luggage conveyer platform as if their bag will mysteriously vanish if they don’t pluck it from the revolving carrier NOW!

The conveyer is in full motion but there’s nothing coming; we’re probably ten minutes watching the sectional portions of the carrier and here’s the first luggage coming through the curtained opening. Carol’s bag comes first and she picks it off the conveyor; next mine shows itself and I drag it off so we can depart from the baggage claim area. Once we’re into the larger expanse of the terminal we see several gentlemen with signs trying to attract visitor attention. Ah, there he is, our guy holding a sign with my name emblazoned across it. We join him and he takes our bags while he ushers us to his waiting cab. Our driver’s name is Halil; he drives us away from the airport in a Mercedes Taxi, one very comfortable ride!

Unfortunately, it’s dark so we see little of the landscape around us and we’re riding down the ‘wrong’ side of the road, the correct side of course for this country. It’s very odd (as we ride) to see the cars on the opposite side of the road as we’re used to; it’s a little unnerving at first. I try to imagine driving on this side of the highway but dismiss the though as crazy, thinking I might not make it to my destination. The road seems very well maintained and the ride is smooth and rational. I say rational because we’ve lived in Turkey a long time and nearly anything goes on the highways there; no, it shouldn’t but it does most of the time. Here though, Halil uses his lane and he doesn’t exceed the speed limit; we’ve not heard one car horn either.

We’ve ridden about fifteen minutes now and we begin to climb; it seems we have to travel over this mountain range to get to our hotel/resort. As we climb, the city of Lefkosa begins to fill the valley below with lights. This is the old city of Nicosia and it must be fairly large because the illumination tends to fill the valley. The road twists and bends as we climb ever higher to the mountain crest. Once over the ridge we begin a gentle descent down the other side and fifteen minutes later arrive at the hotel. We’re booked into the Acapulco Hotel Resort/Spa near Kyrenia/Girne. I have placed both city names here because they are both in use; Kyrenia is the old city name and Girne is the new.

We extract our bags from the trunk and enter the lobby to go to the reception desk; a very well appointed lobby surrounds us. One young gentleman at the counter greets us and takes our passports; he searches his computer for our reservation and locates it rather quickly. He welcomes us once more, this time by name and asks me to complete a guest registration card. After loading our additional information into his terminal he hands me a card holder and explains we have two cards to the room door and two for the spa. He carefully explains that the loss of these cards will cost us ten Euro each. We won’t probably use the spa but I simply take the cards and he summons an attendant to take us and our bags to our suite.

This is a very large hotel conference center as well and we notice directly across from and facing the reception counter is a conference reception kiosk. Carol says it’s for medical folks; hypertension and arterioscleroses they’re holding their weeklong seminar here. We follow the attendant down the hall and to the right to the elevator. The walls are adorned with ceramic flowers with individual petals plastered into the wall in a three-D effect; they are multi-colored and very lovely additions to the lobby décor.

Once inside the elevator, we note the dining room is one flight below and we’re two flights above the lobby floor. We’re going to the third floor to suite 375 as we leave the elevator we’re led to the right and walk to the end of the corridor. Our room is the last one on the left, Carol slips the door card into the slot on the door handle and there’s that ubiquitous click. Our attendant slips another card into the electrical switch box on the wall just inside the door to light up our room. He brings in our bags, we tip and thank him.

The room has large glass windows on two sides, what a beautiful view! At our bedside the windows are floor to ceiling with a sliding door to the balcony. At the foot of the bed and across the room are two massive sliding windows half way between the floor and the ceiling. I part the curtains on the balcony side of the room and notice even in the dark we can see the vast expense of pools and lighted patios below. I open the sliding door and step out onto the balcony, it’s cool but very pleasant and I can hear the surf pounding the beach. I stand mesmerized for a few minutes, the sound of the waves are so rhythmic and soothing.

It’s still fairly early so we unwind a little, freshen up and then make our way three floors below to have our dinner. (Our reservation includes both breakfast and dinner.) At the entry to the dining room a young waiter asks for our room number; we give it to him and he graciously motions for us to go in. At first glance I would estimate this room to hold two or three hundred people! Meals are buffet style and as we walk further into the room we see on the left the people milling about the islands of prepared foods. Here’s a soup bar, a salad bar and the main course steam table; the food on display is bountiful and extremely well presented.

Above the soup are literally stacks of bread in racks, there must be ten or twelve different varieties. There are two soups, both look and smell wonderful. We decide to browse the selections before getting a plate; after the soup selections we circle the salad bar and find at least twenty different offerings. Now, on the main bar there’s chicken, lamb, pasta and vegetables. Anyone who isn’t pleased with this offering of food isn’t trying nearly hard enough or they’re quite unreasonable. I get a bowl of soup (mushroom), seven kinds of salad and two main dishes (a chicken dish and a lamb dish). Carol fills her plate as well, getting several different dishes from those I’ve chosen.

We make our way to an empty table near the entrance and from the first taste we are both hooked, the food is GREAT! Moments after we’re seated a waiter stops by our table to get our drink order and he has me sign a ticket with my room number and our water annotated on it. It appears all our drinks are above and beyond the dinner price, not included in the hotel package. Seems so odd that water has to be paid for above our reservation cost since breakfast and dinner were included.

We enjoy the delicious meal and I even return for more. We talk about our trip and this incredible complex we’ve been booked into. We also discuss our plans for tomorrow, what we’ll see and the things we’ll do. We’re in a most lovely environment here as well, the walls to one side are covered in wonderful individually lighted painting and the other side is a bank of windows. Each painting hangs in a recessed wall pocket adding to the ambiance of the room. Outside the windows of the opposite wall, maybe three meters from the glass is an exterior wall covered in murals of Roman Ruins and copies of Roman statuary. Between the windows and the wall of Roman art are plenty of plants and shrubs to make the view, even at night very lovely. Each mural and the individual statuary is spot lighted and provides an elegant backdrop to the room.

After dinner we retire to our room and Carol turns on the TV; she searches for BBC Prime and we watch some British Comedy. Several hours evaporate now and we slip into bed for the evening. We can hear the surf now that the TV is off. I relax and listen as the waves pound the rocks and wash across the sand. I can hear the wind, it has increased to some degree since our arrival and I get up to look out the window. I can see the waves illuminated by the hotel’s ambient lighting; white caps form and recede rapidly. I stand at the window watching the waves for several minutes and then open the window a little to listening to the roar of the water. The surf continues to rush the sand with fury, incessantly hammering the beach as if clawing desperately for a foothold.

I reluctantly retreat from the window and return to bed, serenaded by the concert of wind and waves. As I relax waiting on sleep, I’m reminded once more of the lack of adequate bedding in hotels on this side of the world; our cover is a duvet that barely covers the surface of the mattress and does not tuck into the foot of the bed either. Being a restless sleeper it makes it difficult to remain covered; fortunately the room is toasty and I slip off to sleep.

The first light of morning illuminates the drapes and I rise to meet our new day. I pull the drapes aside and there before my eyes is a panorama of the beach and sea reaching to the horizon. I slide the window open and listen; the sea is washing ashore with continued determination. The sun is rising to my right out of my direct view and the breeze coming off the sea continues to create the white caps I saw last night. As I watch and listen I can feel the power of the surf against the sand.

There’s a guy on the beach, he appears to have a broom and he’s picking up debris. He moves through my line of sight from right to left as he surveys the entire beachfront here before the hotel. There’s a flagpole with a red flag fully unfurled flying in the breeze; I learn later that it cautions swimmers again going out into the water. I can’t imagine anyone wanting to go out into that torrent today anyway. As I watch another gentleman appears below me and he’s cleaning the patios around the pools and straightening the chairs. He walks around the backside of the larger pool and uncoils a black hose; he disappears for a moment and the hose comes alive with water. It appears he’s topping off the large pool.

Carol is up now and we talk about breakfast; we dress and descend the stairs to the dining room. There’s no one here this morning to take our room number so we simply go in and survey the breakfast display. Again, the food is plentiful and we fill our plates. I do the traditional Turkish breakfast and Carol mixes her choices for an international flare. After a leisurely breakfast we decide to go for a walk down near the beach. We walk out the lobby entrance and down the stairs turning right toward the beach. In minutes we’re walking a tiled path just above the sand, the roar of the waves up close is deafening. The temperature is cool but very comfortable. We walk along the beachfront area of the hotel for a half-hour or so and then return to our room. We collect our camera for our day’s adventure, then leave the building through the lobby and hale a cab to take us to Kyrenia.

Halil Bey our driver from the airport yesterday is our driver again this morning; the cab company we learn is associated with the hotel. We ask him to take us to the castle where we plan to begin our exploration today. As we ride we notice many store fronts with Christmas Trees in them and they all say Merry Christmas. It seems odd as we’re in another Moslem country but Halil tells us there are many British living here along with numerous other nationalities. He tells us that many Russians are moving here too. In ten to fifteen minutes Halil drops us in front of the castle ticket house. We pay 24 Lira to visit and begin walking across a stone bridge to the entrance through the castle wall. Yes, quite costly for an entry fee, but fully worth it to you.

This castle is thought to date from the 7th century. Like all structures of this kind in the Mediterranean region it has been built, re-built and finally restored as a tourist attraction. At one point in its evolution it was also expanded and had its walls thickened against conquest. The current castle dates from the late fourteen hundreds and is mostly Byzantine. We're told by the literature that the entry was by drawbridge in the early periods of its existence but was later enclosed and now has the smaller double wooden open lattice doors.

Other literature suggests this castle may date from the Roman period as some Roman artifacts have been found within its walls. However its first written record appears around 1200 and expands thereafter. We enter through the wooden doors. Beyond the entry doors we walk up a short incline through a tunnel into an atrium. Off to our right, a sign attracts our attention and directs us to an exhibition hall within the wall. Within this large room we find pictures with narrative descriptions of the life of the castle and those who once occupied its interior. After reviewing the contents of this large hall we return to the atrium and enter through the interior wall.

Immediately through the interior wall we come upon a burial crypt – this is the tomb of Admiral Sadik Pasa (an Algerian). He was an Ottoman Navy commander killed in the Ottoman Conquest of the castle in 1570. Once fully through the interior wall structure we come out into a huge courtyard/parade ground where we can take in the entire structure with a 360 degree turn. There are towers on three corners, two facing the sea. It’s obvious this was a most impressive deterrent to foreign conquest in its heyday. To our left are the living quarters of those who once lived within the walls. Directly across the courtyard from us is the Shipwreck Museum, which once housed the castle arsenal. Contained within the museum are many artifacts the most impressive is a display of the oldest shipwreck known and brought to the surface: 2300 years of age. Additionally, most of its surviving cargo is also on display here in the museum.

We decide before viewing the museum we would explore the towers and rooms ahead of us and to our left. As we walk to the tower our guide joins us. No we didn’t get one until now; she’s a one-eyed yellow tiger cat; we decided to call her ‘Pirate’. She appeared from nowhere and seems to want to show us around; we don’t refuse her invitation. As we ascend into the large tower she climbs the stairs with us and enters each room we enter. She’s extremely fond on me, as I can’t get her from under my feet; she is weaving in and out rubbing my legs as I stand reading displays.

We’re currently in the upper tower and here we’re introduced by diorama to period soldiers. Six periods are represented here by historical costumes. There are several paintings hanging around the tower wall depicting life at different periods in the evolution of this castle. We leave and descend the stairs with Pirate at our feet. At the foot of the stairs we cross into the lower tower area; again there are a number of manikins in period dress. After looking at the displays and watching Pirate stroll through the collection we ascend to visit the museum.

As we enter the Shipwreck Museum, we see a number of large murals painted with harbor scenes of historical significance to the surroundings of ages past. The contents of this museum are findings from the excavation of the ship wreck. The ship was found to be a trading vessel loaded down with millstones and amphora; many of the artifacts are here for your viewing pleasure. Most amazing to us are the 9,000 almonds contained in some of the amphora which were thought to be a crew staple 2300 years ago!

The shipwreck itself is quite the sight; most of the lower hull of the ship is intact. Our literature says it was buried in the sand for all those years and was well preserved in its resting place. It truly gives the preservationist a full view of how ancient ships of the period were constructed. The remains we view here are nearly fifty feet long, the literature says it was originally constructed from Aleppo Pine covered in lead. It’s thought the ship was near 80 years old when a storm took it to the bottom of the sea a kilometer from the coast of Cyprus. It was brought to the surface and placed here in the mid-1960s by archaeologist from the U of PA. Once we leave the museum, Pirate seems to vanish leaving as she had come, mysteriously.

We walk around the courtyard and descend into another tower on the seaside and find at the bottom a weapons workshop diorama. I can hear the hammering of the blacksmith as he pounds out the spears and knives that hang on the walls around him. As we stand looking into this display, I can smell the hot iron and hear each contact of the hammer (I was around just this kind of shop as a child, my father used to work a forge and hot iron). I turn and look back up the stairs we’ve just descended and imagine I can hear the soldiers running up and down bringing weapons needing repair and collecting new weapons as they prepare for battle. Listen, I do hear the chatter of soldiers, ah there it’s louder now – and as I imagine it we’re over taken by a crowd of young men we guess they must be Turkish soldiers on day’s furlough. There are a number of Turkish military facilities around North Cyprus.

Once we’re out of the weapons tower we ascend the wall of the castle and walk the Venetian defense platforms atop the outer walls. The view is superb from up here; the wind is steady but not to cool as it washes over the walls. We walk nearly the entire length of the walls; first down one side and then up the other. From up here we see the Anglican Church on the east side and the Greek Orthodox Church to the west that houses the Icon Museum. To the south are the mountains that provide a backdrop for the city of Kyrenia/Girne.

We’ve now come fully around the top of the castle and descend the ramp way toward the atrium where we came in. just before reaching the entrance again we detour going up a short flight of stairs and through another tunnel to the Byzantine Church of St George. This church was originally outside the castle but was brought within its walls in one of the later restorations by the Venetians. The church was built in the 1100s and it’s quite small but well preserved. It consists of a single hall with an obvious altar platform on the north side.

We’ve spent several hours roaming within these walls and now we’re off to the small harbor to the west side of the castle. We will circle around the harbor and visit the Icon Museum. As we walk we encounter a number of local folks all very friendly and glad to hear our Turkish. We walk passed one harbor café after another until we reach the opposite side from where we started. Here we find an information center and go in to see what they offer in literature. A very pleasant young lady greets us and we chat for a few minutes and she gives us a map. We thank her and walk out onto the street again.

Just across the street is a curious tree, it’s called “The Loving Tree.” The sign says it’s 175-200 years old and male and female always grow together. Its Latin name listed is Bella Solarius. How many visitors do you expect stop to read about a TREE?

We now continue our walk around the waterfront and head back into the city. We don’t go far and we come to the Icon Museum; it’s NOT open! The sign indicates it’s supposed to be but it’s not. We walk on through the city streets stopping at several hotels to get prices in case we return – we know we’ll return to Cyprus but maybe not here, but we want the hotel numbers anyway. Just beyond the museum we spy a carpet shop, it’s called the Gordes Oriental Rug Collection. We visit with the owner for some time and talk carpets. We see a most beautiful Hereke and he’s asking $500 a square meter; a very good price considering this is a quality piece presented to us. Interestingly; this is nearly the same price as in Turkey, I’m impressed. I’m most impressed though with a Bukhara hanging on the wall just inside the shop; it features 33 guls – three rows of eleven – rare and this one is lovely.

We walk around for a little while and then decide to return to the harbor for lunch. As we draw closer to the harbor we’re stopped by a gentleman who offers his card and suggests lunch at his place; Canli Balik Restaurant. We thank him and figure, why not, so we walk to it in the direction he suggests. It’s a little cool but we opt to sit outside anyway over looking the harbor. A young lad brings us two menus; ouch, soup is 10 Lira! Once I get a grip on my wallet we decide to try it ignoring the cost. We get two bowls of lentil soup. The presentation is exquisite; the bowl sits on a large plate and the bowl is mostly decoration with a small central cup for the soup. This much soup in Turkey would be considered an embarrassment as is the price. The soup is excellent however despite the meager amount and the extreme cost. Carol also gets the special – Cyprus Kurfta and a side salad which we decide is radish tops. I forgo lunch beyond the soup and the delicious bread.

It’s getting a little too cool to dawdle here much longer and we go inside so Carol can have Turkish coffee which she proclaims the BEST ever. I ask for the check and part with 55 Lira to satisfy it! Needless to say, I’m scratching this place from my dining list, there’s simply no way lunch should cost that kind of money. We’ll forgo the ‘harbor view’ for a local café next time.

We decide to walk around once more to the Icon Museum but no luck, it’s still closed. Around the corner we walk through a bazaar. Carol finds a small purse she can’t live without and we talk to the owner about Turkey. He visits often and usually by ferry so he can take his own car. We thank the gentleman for his conversation and the purse. We continue our walk and happen upon the Round Tower and within is a gift shop – we decide to stop and look around. The shop is full of local crafts: paintings, drawings, textiles, pottery, photographs and much more. Carol finds a couple dishtowels with Cyprus embroidered on them and we leave to get a cab back to the hotel. We’ve both had more than enough walking for today. Our cab is 20 Lira. We could have gotten a dolmus for 2 lira but I wasn’t interested in waiting for it; my feet and legs have had it for today.

Once we’re back at the hotel we relax in the lounge adjacent to the lobby where Carol has a Turkish coffee and I get a mineral water. Since it’s winter the sun has already retired for the day and we simply enjoy each other’s company and talk about our day. Our waitress stops by with our drinks and we talk for a moment with her; it turns out she’s from Osmaniye just an hour east of Adana. While walking the harbor today we spoke with a number of people who are from Adana as well.

Time marches on; we decide to go to our room and freshen up before dinner. As I close the room door we are again amazed by the roar of the waves crashing on the rocks below. Even with the windows closed the sound of the surf fills the void. Carol goes to the window and pulls it open, the volume increases four fold. The breeze is very cool and the smell is clean and fresh. I close the window now and we leave heading for the stairs to descend to the dinning room. As we approach the waiter at the door we give him our suite number and go in.

Turks are not early diners but the place is already a buzz of people both seated and milling about the dinner selections. We each chose our meals from everything offered and find an empty table. The food selections are different this evening and we both eat more than we should, HaHaHa. A buffet is a dangerous thing for those who appreciate the art of grazing. We continue our conversation about our discoveries of the day and talk about our next trip; yes, we will return.

With a very pleasant meal concluded we retire to our room and Carol clicks the TV to life. We watch more BBC Prime and then slip off to prepare for the coming day’s adventure – Bellapais Abbey, good night.

My awareness of morning comes with the room fully illuminated. There’s no sun to greet this fine morning; the clouds are heavy and the morning is gray. I look out across the Mediterranean and the sky blends with the sea. This view is still glorious and I’m mesmerized for several minutes as I stand taking it all in. There’s something calming about the sights and sounds of the sea; I know it’s quite daffy but I always feel as if I’ve been a seafarer in a past existence. It’s funny, I’m not a fan of water but every time I’m staying at the seaside I’m far more relaxed than any time in my life.

Once Carol discovers the new day, she’s up and we dress for breakfast. The buffet is again bountiful but we restrain our urges to over indulge. We have the typical Turkish breakfast and depart for our room. We collect our things and make a sweep of the closet and dressers to be sure we have all we came with. We each pack and prepare to leave the room. We will leave our bags at the front desk and spend the morning touring the Abbey up on the mountainside.

The front desk clerk is more than happy to take charge of our bags and we go in search of a taxi. We look for Halil but he’s not available; the next taxi in line is a six-door Mercedes – a limousine! I protest we don’t need anything this size but the driver assures me the cost is the same, every cab is metered you see. With that, we simply climb in and ride off for the visit to the Bellapais Abbey.

We ride for maybe twenty minutes noting the lack of signs as we go; there was a sign off the main highway but we’ve seen none since that one. I tell Carol how difficult I think it would be to find this place on our own without a proper map or local instructions. We begin a gentle climb and make a left turn; we continue the climb curving right now and then reach the village of Bellapais. The street is quite narrow with houses on both sides then the driver pulls to stop at the site. Our first view is of the south side of the building. There’s a small park between the building and us; our driver indicates he will park the taxi behind the Abbey and we tell him fine, we’ll be about an hour.

It’s just after nine and we learn it opens at nine, that works out well. Right here as we get out of the taxi there’s a refreshment stand and a gentleman offers us tea; we thank him but beg off until we see the building we’ve come to visit. There’s a small tour group already there and a young woman is explaining the attributes of the structure. I walk over to the ticket building but no one is there, the gentleman who offered tea says to wait a moment the guy will be along shortly. In just a few minutes I see the young man coming from inside the courtyard of the Abbey and I walk with him to the ticket booth. I give up the 18 Lira entry fee and get our wonderfully illustrated 4 x 7 inch tickets. Unlike our castle tickets, which were adorned with only a castle photograph, this one has two photos, one of the Abbey and a second of Salamis a site we won’t see this trip.


This original structure was built between 1198 and 1205 for Augustinian Monks who had come to Cyprus to escape turmoil in Jerusalem. There were several periods of construction as the facility grew in use over time, the last was between 1324 and 1359. The building now consists of a forecourt, church, cloister, refectory, cellar, kitchen, kitchen court, undercroft or vault, chapter house and sacristy.

The tour group heads to the church so we walk the courtyard and descend into the cellar and kitchen complex. This area is well preserved and contains a lovely stone floor. Once we ascend, we enter the refectory. I notice the pulpit attached to the wall toward the front of the hall on the left and I find the stairs to ascend. There’s a tiny stairway within the stone wall and I go up to stand in the pulpit. What a great view! The word coming from here must have been well received throughout the hall.

Next just out the door I spy a sarcophagus and go to view it more closely, I find there are actually two; one well ornamented on the exterior while the other has a plain surface. Our literature does not discuss their significance at all. Now we walk toward the rear of the building circling the cloister as we go. The cloister is open to the elements and is now a beautiful green lawn, I would guess it’s probably 15 by 20 meters square. To the east of the cloister is the undercroft and chapter house both in a semi-state of ruin.

We hear the tour group outside now so we move around to the church. This is a currently active Greek Orthodox Church. It’s fairly dark inside and it takes a moment for the eyes to adjust but what an incredible place! The front of the church is adorned with icons, there must be twenty or thirty of them. There’s a wood pulpit attached to the wall with a curved wood stair leading to it. I opt out of a climb this time because it seems out of order in a functioning church. All of the wood is dark, either painted or natural, and obviously OLD. The bench-like pews have been set to the side leaving a wide isle open down the center of the church. There are three chandeliers suspended from the high ceiling but there light does little to fully illuminate the sanctuary. Think of it; this church has served for over 800 years!

What an amazing structure; we retreat reluctantly extremely pleased we had the opportunity to stand in such a marvelous building. If only we had the privilege of attending a service (I doubt I would understand any of it) in this great hall.

As we reenter the park, the gentleman who offered us warm greetings on our arrival again offers tea or other refreshment; we sit and except his hospitality. Our taxi driver is already having his third or forth tea, we’re quite certain. After tea we walk across the street and check out the shops that offer local tourist fare; we purchase only a book written by a local author highlighting the attributes of the Kyrenia Castle that we visited yesterday. The book is full of his drawings and watercolors and I feel like it would add to our visit so buy it for our collection.

Our visit was just over an hour, we thank the driver and return to our hotel. We’ve had a great time and it seems as though we’ve been away a week not just two days. There’s far more to see and experience here – this will not be our last trip to Cyprus. I know you will enjoy it as much as we did!




Fred´s Farewell
A Day Trip in January
Drive to Roman Ruins
An Autumn Drive
Cappadocia - Once Again
A Trip to Ephesus and Pamukkale
Fred´s Tarsus
Northern Cyprus Over Thanksgiving
Cilician Drive
Kocatepe Mosque - Ankara
A Visit to Anıtkabir
Fred´s Weekend in Ankara
A Day in Anavarza
Driving in the Heartland
Spontaneity by Fred
A Trip to Soğanlı and Gülşehir
An Antakya Weekend
A Weekend Around Adana
A Rainsoaked Adventure
A Mediterranean Adventure
Fred's Bor Adventure
Fred's Weekend Escape to Ihlara
Fred's Lecture on Carpet
Fred's Weekend Away
Uzuncaburc with Fred
Museums of Cappadocia
Göreme - A Different Way
Night Train to Ankara
Cave Home Tour
A Trip to Kayseri - Özkonak
Kastabala in August
A Bittersweet Adventure
Silifke, Anamur and more
Around Adana
Catalhoyuk & Aksehir Adventures
Nigde Exploration
Cappadocia Again
Kahramanmaraş Again
A Trip to Kayseri - Sultanhani
A Morning Walk
Sunday Lunch Overlooking the Lake
Fred's Kahramanmaras
Holiday Drive to Mersin
A Sunday Drive to Yumurtalik
Fred's Tarsus
Fred's Cappadocia
Botas Seaside Drive
Fred's Konya Museums
A Bus Tour to Antakya
A Walk with Cuddle
Ankara Again
Gaziantep Museum by Fred
Moores' Anniversary Weekend
Shopping in Sanliurfa
The Seaside at Karataş
This is Ankara
Tour to Gaziantep-Harran
Trip to Konya
Birsen's Horizons
Fred's Trip Logs
Bahar's Views on...
Business World
From Members' Pen
Interviews with Members
Moms & Kids Corner
Pets with Dr. Demirel
The archives of The Guide
The Archives of Turkishtime
Teen's world

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The Curious Case of Çatalhöyük
Filmekimi 2017
Istanbul Biennial
Bodrum Jazz Festival
Bodrum Music Festival
Gümüşlük Festival






 

Fred's Trip Logs
Fred´s Farewell
A Day Trip in January
Drive to Roman Ruins
An Autumn Drive
Cappadocia - Once Again
A Trip to Ephesus and Pamukkale
Fred´s Tarsus
Northern Cyprus Over Thanksgiving
Cilician Drive
Kocatepe Mosque - Ankara
A Visit to Anıtkabir
Fred´s Weekend in Ankara
A Day in Anavarza
Driving in the Heartland
Spontaneity by Fred
A Trip to Soğanlı and Gülşehir
An Antakya Weekend
A Weekend Around Adana
A Rainsoaked Adventure
A Mediterranean Adventure
Fred's Bor Adventure
Fred's Weekend Escape to Ihlara
Fred's Lecture on Carpet
Fred's Weekend Away
Uzuncaburc with Fred
Museums of Cappadocia
Göreme - A Different Way
Night Train to Ankara
Cave Home Tour
A Trip to Kayseri - Özkonak
Kastabala in August
A Bittersweet Adventure
Silifke, Anamur and more
Around Adana
Catalhoyuk & Aksehir Adventures
Nigde Exploration
Cappadocia Again
Kahramanmaraş Again
A Trip to Kayseri - Sultanhani
A Morning Walk
Sunday Lunch Overlooking the Lake
Fred's Kahramanmaras
Holiday Drive to Mersin
A Sunday Drive to Yumurtalik
Fred's Tarsus
Fred's Cappadocia
Botas Seaside Drive
Fred's Konya Museums
A Bus Tour to Antakya
A Walk with Cuddle
Ankara Again
Gaziantep Museum by Fred
Moores' Anniversary Weekend
Shopping in Sanliurfa
The Seaside at Karataş
This is Ankara
Tour to Gaziantep-Harran
Trip to Konya

Focus On
Birsen's Horizons
Fred's Trip Logs
Bahar's Views on...
Business World
From Members' Pen
Interviews with Members
Moms & Kids Corner
Pets with Dr. Demirel
The archives of The Guide
The Archives of Turkishtime
Teen's world




Rhythm of Town

Events calendar
Valentine's Day
Istanbul Live
This Weekend in Istanbul
Ankara Live
This Weekend in Ankara
Social Clubs in Ankara
Restaurants and Cafes in Istanbul
Restaurants and Cafes in Ankara
Sightseeing in Istanbul
Sightseeing in Ankara
Various Discoveries
Best of...
Art and Culture in Istanbul
Art & Culture in Ankara
For Kids - Istanbul
For Kids - Ankara
Hobbies Istanbul
Hobbies Ankara
Sports
Biletix System
Films on cnbc-e


Turkeywide

Sustainable Living Film Festival
Turkish Ruins
Mount Ararat Trek
Seeing the Truth
Filmmor 2017
XJAZZ Festival 2017
International Izmir Festival
The Flying Broom Festival
Gümüşlük Festival
Bodrum Music Festival
Bodrum Jazz Festival
Filmekimi 2017
In Other Cities
Baksı Museum
It´s Time to Take Pictures!!
Photo of the Month
Inside Out in Istanbul
Sand Sculpture Festival
Mandatory Health Insurance for Expats
Impossible Fairies - Out Now
Istanbul Contemporary Cuisine
Changes on Work Permit
New Year
Turkey's TOP 10s
Anzac Day
İzmir Wild Life Park
Antalya State Opera and Ballet - March
Izmir State Opera and Ballet - March
Registration of Canadians Abroad
News From The Expat Harem
Latest Amendments in Land Registry Law


Events Calendar

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Shopping
Shopping in Istanbul
Shopping in Ankara
Product showcase
Shopping corner

Weather

Istanbul

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