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We will send regular newsletters to our members who have signed up for receiving it during the registration. In 'mymerhaba' newsletter, our editorial staff provides updates, with regard to any information related to places worth visiting, viewing, or otherwise worth knowing, for those who care to know more....

Fred's Weekend Escape to Ihlara



by Fred Moore – September 2008

It's a holiday weekend; Carol and I have escaped our daily routine for another adventure in the heartland of this wonderful country. As usual, we stay in Goreme at the Ottoman House, our home away from home. This weekend we've decided to visit a village of our past (Guzelyurt) and two new sights to add to our collection of places to see (Ihlara Valley and Mustafa Pasha).

We arrive in Goreme in the early afternoon following our leisurely drive from Adana through the Taurus Mountains. We take all of our things to our room and then take time for lunch at the Cappadocia Kabob. After lunch we decide to relax in the Ottoman House pool; this is an indoor facility that we've never taken advantage of before. We take our swimsuits and go to the basement dressing rooms. The pool area is spacious with chase lounge furniture around the pool. There's a hanging ladder on each end of the pool – I take the one furthest from the entry door. The water is COLD! I noted on the other end of the pool the thermometer reflected a temperature of 80 degrees – this doesn't feel like 80 to me!

Anyway, I ease myself a step at a time into the water and then turn to sit on the top step of the ladder. I know one should simply ‘go-for-it' and drive right in but I don't do that. After several minutes of reluctance I finally force myself fully into the water and swim across the pool. I find there is no shallow end as I'm used to in pools; this pool is about a meter and half deep all over (about 5 feet). Now that I'm fully engulfed in the water, it's quite pleasant. Off to the side of the main pool there's a children's wading pool as well. Carol stepped into it and it's about a half-meter deep.

We spend well over an hour swimming laps in the pool and enjoy our afternoon; the sun filters through the translucent roof and warms the pool area very nicely. We're the only guests this afternoon and it's like having our own private pool.

After our swim we retreat to our room to relax and enjoy a quiet evening on our balcony. It's not as cool as I thought it might be here, but it's very nice as compared to the HEAT of Adana. Carol and I savor cups of tea and coffee as we enjoy the relaxation.

We opted for dinner on the roof – we have a private dining experience – no one else in the Ottoman House has chosen to eat at the hotel this evening. Their special tonight is sac tava, a very flavorful flaming stir-fry. We begin dinner with tomato soup, then we have a potato dish that is like spiced mash potatoes deep fried and delicious. After we consume the first two courses, the stir-fry I mentioned comes on a flaming wok; it's chopped meat, onions, peppers, garlic and rice.

Sitting up here on the terrace is lovely – we see only one star; probably the North Star – unfortunately the streetlights below cast too much light for us to see more. We finish our main entrée and the dessert (sutlac) is served, Carol savors both portions. NO, I don't appreciate rice pudding it at all.

As usual we have a wonderful dinner and have eaten too much. We thank the staff and descend to our room once again. We decide to soak up more of the evening air and sit out on our balcony until bedtime.

We enjoy a leisurely breakfast with friends from Adana and then decide to take a drive. We travel the back-country to Mustafa Pasha; a village we've passed through on a number of occasions but have never stopped in. In the distant past (late 19th early 20th century) the village was Greek Orthodox town known as Sinanos. The literature on this village is extremely sketchy; I have several books on Turkey, only one from 1976 has a paragraph to highlight this community!

As we enter the village from Urgup, we note a brown historic sign indicating a church is nearby; we decide to turn and investigate it. We visit the ancient Greek Orthodox Church of St. Ayios Vasilios, parking just above the entrance sidewalk. We pay the 16 TL fee (very high price, we think) and descend a steep staircase into a cave church. There are several rooms off the main hall and this entire church has been carved into the hillside. When I look out the windows that have grates over them I find we're several hundred feet off the valley floor below. There are some very beautiful frescos (as usual, most have been defaced to some degree) but it's still very evident this was a significant place of worship in the distant past. The walls are whitewashed along with the numerous square columns in the church. These columns are obviously for esthetic purposes NOT structure supports since this is a cave church. Visit -- the cost is well worth it!

After our visit to the church, we drive back toward the village center to find the Greek House, an old Greek home converted into a restaurant and inn. This building reminds us very much of the many ethnographic museums we've visited throughout Turkey. The building isn't truly unique (it looks like a big square stone box) until one passes across the threshold of the main door into the interior courtyard, which has been transformed into a dinning area for their restaurant. The courtyard is over half covered by the second floor of the building and the architecture is well worth your visit.

We order lunch and while we wait for it, we're invited to visit the upstairs. We're directed to the double ancient staircase in the far corner and we ascend the carpet-covered, somewhat-steep stairs.

The double staircase becomes a single one at the first landing and we arrive at the second floor landing at a doorway into a large hall with more tables for diners. Off to each side of this main hall are other rooms with traditional style seating; cushions are arranged along the outer walls and large circular trays are set for the diners. These settings are quite traditional, as you must sit on cushions around the trays. The wood ceilings and walls are beautifully artistic (reminiscent of Ottoman style houses we've visited before) and again worth a stop to see if you happen to be in the village of Mustafa Pasha.

We return to our table down stairs and enjoy a very leisurely lunch; we're the only ones in the building aside from the staff. The courtyard atmosphere is wonderful, the historic nature of the place is truly consuming and every view lands your eye on a treasure of man's past in this country. As an example, the photos on the wall in my direct view have to be men of significance within the confines of the village or more appropriate to the house itself. There are a number of old agricultural hand tools on display and old carpets both on the floor beneath our feet and hung on the walls. The small portion of open courtyard is covered with an arbor with grapevines laden with a bounty of grapes. One corner of the dinning area is set aside as a ‘tourist trap' with local crafts for sale. Carol has manti (it's like miniature ravioli in a yogurt garlic sauce) for lunch and I have soup and salad Carol says her manti is good and my soup and salad is as well; should certainly be for the price (it's quite costly, much to our surprise).

After lunch we head for Urgup to visit our friend Murat. However, before we get out of the village we spot some lovely carpets and back up to investigate. We enter into the interior of an old caravan saray that has been restored and turned into this wonderful carpet emporium. A young woman follows us through the place but we see nothing we really need to take home and don't get involved in prices. The last room we visit within the place is set up for carpet production; they make some of their own designs. The restored building is certainly worth a look.

On the road again we get to Urgup and pull up in front of Murat's shop just as someone is pulling away – perfect timing! We're greeted cordially and go inside. Almost immediately we're in a conversation about beautiful old carpets and kilims. Murat disappears into his basement and returns with some exquisite master works of Manastir kilims. The work of these pieces is extremely fine; the wool is thin and the color bold. He offers us the privilege to view three examples in varying stages of life; all three have but a few colors:  one basically red and blue, the other two differing shades of blue and tan. These pieces are surely 150 years of age and they show their maturity with the finest of style.

Murat slips away once more and returns with a Mudjar corridor carpet; this piece is adorned with the boteh design and a wonderful muted purple color. Along with it he has a couple of old Kirsehir carpets and a very old and most lovely Maden mihrab carpet. The Kirsehir pieces are nice but I'm drawn to the badly worn and tattered Maden prayer carpet. This classic antique carpet maintains it's richness even though it has served a family, or several of them, over its lifetime. It's gently placed on the floor and it takes several minutes to smooth out all its tattered edges. Someone has sewn a kilim piece onto the back of it in an effort to try to salvage the thing. To the novice, this is simply a rag that should be thrown out with the rubbish; but to the trained eye, this is a carpet of rare and exquisite beauty. This aged carpet speaks to me – I only wish I could unravel its life story!

We spend a few quality hours with Murat and these treasured masterpieces but as time slips away and we must reluctantly bid our farewell for this visit. We thank him for his hospitality and for sharing these beautiful ‘old friends' with us and we're off. We return to our home in Goreme, leave the car and walk to dinner at the Cappadocia Kabob. After a very fine meal we walk the main business street in the village. We stop to chat with friends but mostly just stroll our way back to the Ottoman House for the evening on our balcony.

It's 3 a.m. and the Ramazan drummer has just broken the tranquillity of the early morning hours; I come nearly !BOLT! upright out the bed! I had forgotten that the Holy Month of Ramazan began this weekend. This month begins the sun-up to sundown fast; nothing may pass the lips of the believer during daylight hours. Tradition has a drummer passing through the villages to alert the occupants to get up and eat before sun-up. At sundown there is a call from the mosque to alert the villagers that eating and drinking is again permitted; this is what's known as the Iftar Dinner – breaking of the fast for the day.

This drummer shocks and amazes me, usually we hear what might be akin to a bass drum beat but tonight this young man (yes, it was a young man, I saw him out the window) beats his drum in spurts of sharp rapid beats and it's very loud. If this performance wasn't enough to wake you, every dog in the village is now providing us with a full concert of barks, howls and yaps.

Just when the cacophony fades from my conscious mind and I think I might get back to sleep the neighborhood roosters begin their morning ritual symphony of crowing; as they welcome our new day. I wonder how they've slept. Do chickens even sleep? HaHaHa

I decide sleep is out of the question now and simply get up. Carol doesn't seem to have been affected so much by this succession of wake-up calls as I have been so I let her sleep. I step out on the balcony; the air is crisp and filled with the burst of gas jets from the balloons overhead. Between the bursts of gas jets from the balloons I hear the chatter of the black birds soaring around the houses and the cliff faces. It's only 6:45 so there's not yet much going on so the sounds from above carry across the landscape. I don't stay outside long before I realize it will be much more comfortable wearing my long sleeve denim shirt!

It isn't long before Carol has joined me and we ascend the stairs to our most welcome breakfast. No matter how many times we stay at the Ottoman House, I never tire of the abundant buffet that is spread for the guests. I have a plate half-filled with quartered tomatoes and half filled with sliced cucumbers. I get a second plate and fill it with morning salami and white cheese. Our Adana friends are already at a table on the terrace and we join them. We have a lovely visit and enjoy our individual choices for the morning feast and then go our own ways. They will be returning home today but Carol and I will stay tonight and return tomorrow.

Our goal today is to visit Guzelyurt and Ihlara Valley. We plan to drive to Derinkuyu and then west out through the country. We travel the asphalt ribbons of black and gray bending and curving through and over golden brown hills. We see fields of potatoes, wheat stubble left from recent harvests and hillsides to steep for cultivation. We drive for a couple of hours before we reach the major crossroads to Guzelyurt, Ihlara Valley and Belisirma. Here we find a very nice sign with directions to a number of sights and one bold acclamation:  “No visit to Cappadocia can be complete without a visit to Guzelyurt.” We would agree with that declaration!

We've not visited Guzelyurt in 12 maybe 15 years; I wonder if I will find it as it was; as though anything ever stays the same.

A Turkish lady who worked for me in 1991 initially introduced us to this village by way of a paper she had written about the village's past. This was a Greek Orthodox village at the turn of the last century and was wholly engulfed in the population exchange between Greece and Turkey in 1923. HISTORICAL NOTE: the 1923 population exchange between Greece and Turkey is the first large-scale population exchange or agreed mutual expulsion in the 20th century. It involved some two million people most of them forcibly made refugees and denaturalized from homelands of centuries or millennia, in a treaty promoted and overseen by the international community as part of the Treaty of Lausanne. The document about the population exchange was signed at Lausanne, Switzerland in 1923, between the governments of Greece and Turkey. The exchange took place between Turkish citizens of the Greek Orthodox religion established in Turkish territory and of Greek citizens of the Muslim religion established in Greek territory.

As we make our way into the village we find it's market day and the street is a flurry of activity. I crawl through the street hardly moving as villagers dart back and forth across the street in front of the car. Most of these folks are totally oblivious to my passing and I have to look out for them as them do not pay me any mind at all. We pass by tarp cover after tarp cover of produce venders, fabric venders, pot, pan & kitchen venders and the occasional chicken sales person. This is a typical street bazaar that happens one day a week in nearly every village across Turkey. We have two in Incirlik each week: one on Sunday, another on Thursday.

After ten minutes of intense creeping through this chaotic scene, I spy a sign indicating I need to make a right turn onto a narrow car-lined street. Many of the churches of this village are below us. We descend a steep winding street to an entry control booth where a gentleman asks for 5 Lira each; we pay and continue down the hill to park. We park just outside the walls of the Church of Gregorios built in 1897. We ascend the hill on foot and find the entire complex under renovation; a sign indicates we're viewing a nearly 400,000 TL restoration. At today's conversion rate that's about a $325,000 project. It's now listed as a mosque/church as it was transformed from church to mosque in 1924. The building is the typical cross design with a dome atop the intersection of the cross. We can't get inside the church due to the intense construction but walk completely around the building courtyard. At the back of the church we note a trench dug at the base of the foundation, the cornerstone has been exposed and it's inscribed with 1897 and some Greek Lettering we can not read.

Around to one side of the church we find a building covered in white letter/numbers. As I study this oddity for a few minutes I realize these are completely in order, it's a code. This building was obviously dismantled and then reconstructed; it was probably in some stage of ruin before being rebuilt as we see it today. I try to think back to our visit so many years ago but the only thoughts I can bring to the surface are of the church and its location at the bottom of this hill. It's a little frustrating to me how the ‘password' to information in our mind is always missing when we want to unlock the file folder with some historic information.

As we walk through the grounds of this ancient church, we stop to watch a stonemason work a large block of stone to smooth and size it for the life size puzzle he is solving. He first works the stone with a power tool that looks as though he is grinding the end of the block and then he carefully uses a flat pick like tool to hammer a texture into that same end. There are several workers on the job today and nothing I see looks like easy work. We notice a door partially open on this side of the building and peer into the interior; it's a chaos of construction materials and the only thing of the building we see are the columns holding the roof up. The floor is or appears to be dirt and there's a trench cut into it just inside this opening. There's a messy profusion of electrical wiring snaking across the dirt and piles of tile to one side.

After a few minutes of watching the workers we make our way out of the courtyard and venture on to see other sights within this ‘park'. Just across the street from our parking space there's a sign for Sivisli Church. We ascend a cobblestone staircase up and into the hillside here before us. It isn't bad until we reach nearly the top; the rock cut steps now become nearly a 45-degree slant and Carol suggests we go no further. These last eight or ten steps are covered by an arched tunnel and I decide to ascend just enough to see through the tunnel. The church is right there at the top, I decide to carefully ascend and visit the church since we've gotten this far already. It's fully carved into the hillside. I can see it was obviously adorned with beautiful fresco paintings in the ancient past, as the obliterated remains stare back at me today. The defacing of these paintings is nearly complete except for the one on the ceiling, which is covered with pot-marks and soot from a fire or years of fires. Many of these old cave dwellings show evidence of raging fires; the walls and ceilings are often blackened by soot. I take a few photos and rejoin Carol at the steps where we descend back toward the car.

Once we're in the car again we drive deeper into the park where we find numerous other signs for churches. The cliff face we reach at the end of the road is adorned with many obvious entries to cave dwellings. We don't take the time to investigate them because we want to get to the Analipsis Church we saw on our way into the village. We turn around here and slowly drive back the way we came. Once atop the hill again we have to crawl through the bazaar at a snail's pace and there on the wall we spy some kilims. We decide a few minutes here is a must (HaHaHa) and find a spot to park. We fine a lovely little shop and spend some time looking at Kadir's collection. We interrupt our day here only 30 minutes and move on without taking anything with us!

On our way again now, we drive out of the village and make the left turn onto a winding country road toward the Analipsis Church. We can easily see the church off in the distance, it appears to be constructed on a huge rock pedestal in the middle of a field. We drive right up to foot of the pedestal and park. We walk around looking for an entry to the building; finally we ascend a trail and find a precarious set of steps into the courtyard. I say that like we entered the place; we did not. The ‘stairs' left us with some considerable pause; we're not very athletic people and chose to leave without trekking further. We're both fairly certain we visited this church those many years ago and find it has been restored since that time. I'm still having ‘password challenges' as I try to open that file from way back but it feels as though this was the church we visited then.

We linger on this beautiful day here above the dam even though we're not able to enter this compound. The breeze coming across the empty expanse before us is wonderful and we savor it. The view from up here is vast, we gaze across a landscape that has every conceivable natural wonder, from the river below to the mountains in the distance. I too, can't help but imagine the mass of humanity that trekked out of this region into a life totally unknown and foreign to them. I can't fathom being ‘exchanged' in some deal between governments that I had NO control over!

We get back to the car and drive away. It's lunchtime and we decide to find something to eat, we head toward Ihlara Valley, our next stop. Once we reach the intersection that sent us to Guzelyurt, Carol notices a petrol station just ahead and we decide a rest stop is necessary. We find excellent facilities and the station has a market so we opt to buy some snacks; we make our lunch potato chips a juice. I know, that's not very good but it will hold us over until we find the proper food. I buy two bags, one plain the other a very interesting chip--it's ketchup flavored. They turn out to be pretty tasty. These chips remind me of cracker jacks, the bags contains a prize; in one I win a free packet of coffee and the other, another bag of chips. We sit at the station in the shade enjoying the breeze through the car windows and eat.

On our way again now, we return to the crossroads and head towards Ihlara Valley. Our literature indicates that as many as 4,000 dwellings exist in this valley, a hundred of them churches. It also tells us that 8,000 people once inhabited this place. We drive to the village of Ihlara and to the tourist pavilion on the rim above the valley. We're told the valley floor is 100 meters (325 feet) below and the Melendiz River flows through the valley. From our perch above the valley we can see the stairs that descend to the river below, nearly 400 steps to the bottom. We pay the 5 Lira to enter the patio below the parking area where the steps begin their downward spiral. Carol decides we need to at least walk down to the first rest area below and I reluctantly agree. We find our descent is 150 steps deep, once there we sit on the benches provided and watch two tour groups descend the whole way. I wasn't concerned with the stairs at all; they are very nice and well maintained with a handrail even. The climb out of the valley was my concern; I wanted to see the place not die in it, HaHaHa.

We WILL return, we've discovered if we enter through Belisirma we can drive into the valley and there are restaurants on the river's edge.

After an hour and many photos we get back to the car and head for Selime, a village at the north end of the valley. As we pass through Selime we notice a collection of carpets hanging in a yard; as we get closer we find a young lad washing carpets in a concrete reservoir. We pull off the road and up next to a building that says Anatolian Carpets across the front of it. We notice many lovely pieces hanging outside and decide to go in and have a look. We enter a large room, rather dark (lighted only through the door we entered) and in behind us comes the young lad. There are NO adults around but in quick time we see that isn't necessary, the young man begins opening and showing us a number of carpets and kilims as we indicate an interest in this one or that one. Most of what we are exposed to are primitive pieces, well worn or simply too new to be considered.

We spend a half-hour with the lad and ask the cost of a few pieces (reasonable certainly) but opt to leave without a purchase. We bid the young man good day and head for the main road between Aksaray and Nevsehir. The roads out here are very nice and we enjoy the drive through the countryside. Once at the main road we turn and head for Nevsehir and Goreme.

We talk about all we've discovered today and look forward to our next visit where we can travel around the other side of the valley. We're back in Goreme now and opt for an early dinner. We walk down to talk to our friend Faruk to ask about his brother's restaurant where we've never eaten; Carol wants to try something different. We learn the restaurant is immediately down the street from Faruk's carpet shop. Refik, Faruk's brother meets us at the carpet shop and walks with us to his place. The restaurant is Nazar Borek Gozleme; we are seated in a covered patio and order a large Greek salad and main dishes. When the salad appears it's huge and it's delicious. I order chicken shish and Carol gets a borek; both are great and we kick ourselves for never stopping here before.

While enjoying our dinner, I can't help but overhear the conversation of a couple sitting across from us. They are obviously new here and are looking for the highlights of the area because they only have a day or two to see it. The young lady goes somewhere to ask questions and I decide to barge in on the gentleman's solitude. I ask a couple questions and make a couple of suggestions. When the lady returns we learn our new friends are Jeff and Zoë. They are traveling through Turkey and enjoying it very much. They thank us and hurry on their way, they are rushing off to get a photo or two of the sunset over Cappadocia.

Carol and I finish our dinner slowly and savor every bite. We thank Refik and start back to the Ottoman House. Half way up the street we again meet Jeff and Zoë coming back, we get involved in a conversation that wends it way through Turkish adventures and into the question of where to purchase a grain bag. Zoë is interested in buying a bag she can make into a pillow to lounge around on. Carol invites them to visit our friend Faruk's carpet shop, Tribal Collections. Carol with Zoë, talk with Faruk about bags and in no time there are pieces all over the floor. Zoë asks questions; Carol and Faruk answer them. Faruk has a number of different sizes and many designs and colors; Zoë settles on an aged cicim kilim faced grain bag in mostly blue tones. It's folded and placed in a zip bag that's no larger than a lunch box. Once more we say our farewells to Jeff and Zoë, we thank Faruk and walk back to the Ottoman House.

This has been an extraordinary weekend; as always, a quiet time away with no intense HEAT. We've collected a few new sights and met new friends. Can life be anymore rewarding?




Fred´s Farewell
A Day Trip in January
Drive to Roman Ruins
An Autumn Drive
Cappadocia - Once Again
A Trip to Ephesus and Pamukkale
Fred´s Tarsus
Northern Cyprus Over Thanksgiving
Cilician Drive
Kocatepe Mosque - Ankara
A Visit to Anıtkabir
Fred´s Weekend in Ankara
A Day in Anavarza
Driving in the Heartland
Spontaneity by Fred
A Trip to Soğanlı and Gülşehir
An Antakya Weekend
A Weekend Around Adana
A Rainsoaked Adventure
A Mediterranean Adventure
Fred's Bor Adventure
Fred's Weekend Escape to Ihlara
Fred's Lecture on Carpet
Fred's Weekend Away
Uzuncaburc with Fred
Museums of Cappadocia
Göreme - A Different Way
Night Train to Ankara
Cave Home Tour
A Trip to Kayseri - Özkonak
Kastabala in August
A Bittersweet Adventure
Silifke, Anamur and more
Around Adana
Catalhoyuk & Aksehir Adventures
Nigde Exploration
Cappadocia Again
Kahramanmaraş Again
A Trip to Kayseri - Sultanhani
A Morning Walk
Sunday Lunch Overlooking the Lake
Fred's Kahramanmaras
Holiday Drive to Mersin
A Sunday Drive to Yumurtalik
Fred's Tarsus
Fred's Cappadocia
Botas Seaside Drive
Fred's Konya Museums
A Bus Tour to Antakya
A Walk with Cuddle
Ankara Again
Gaziantep Museum by Fred
Moores' Anniversary Weekend
Shopping in Sanliurfa
The Seaside at Karataş
This is Ankara
Tour to Gaziantep-Harran
Trip to Konya
Birsen's Horizons
Fred's Trip Logs
Bahar's Views on...
Business World
From Members' Pen
Interviews with Members
Moms & Kids Corner
Pets with Dr. Demirel
The archives of The Guide
The Archives of Turkishtime
Teen's world

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Fred's Trip Logs
Fred´s Farewell
A Day Trip in January
Drive to Roman Ruins
An Autumn Drive
Cappadocia - Once Again
A Trip to Ephesus and Pamukkale
Fred´s Tarsus
Northern Cyprus Over Thanksgiving
Cilician Drive
Kocatepe Mosque - Ankara
A Visit to Anıtkabir
Fred´s Weekend in Ankara
A Day in Anavarza
Driving in the Heartland
Spontaneity by Fred
A Trip to Soğanlı and Gülşehir
An Antakya Weekend
A Weekend Around Adana
A Rainsoaked Adventure
A Mediterranean Adventure
Fred's Bor Adventure
Fred's Weekend Escape to Ihlara
Fred's Lecture on Carpet
Fred's Weekend Away
Uzuncaburc with Fred
Museums of Cappadocia
Göreme - A Different Way
Night Train to Ankara
Cave Home Tour
A Trip to Kayseri - Özkonak
Kastabala in August
A Bittersweet Adventure
Silifke, Anamur and more
Around Adana
Catalhoyuk & Aksehir Adventures
Nigde Exploration
Cappadocia Again
Kahramanmaraş Again
A Trip to Kayseri - Sultanhani
A Morning Walk
Sunday Lunch Overlooking the Lake
Fred's Kahramanmaras
Holiday Drive to Mersin
A Sunday Drive to Yumurtalik
Fred's Tarsus
Fred's Cappadocia
Botas Seaside Drive
Fred's Konya Museums
A Bus Tour to Antakya
A Walk with Cuddle
Ankara Again
Gaziantep Museum by Fred
Moores' Anniversary Weekend
Shopping in Sanliurfa
The Seaside at Karataş
This is Ankara
Tour to Gaziantep-Harran
Trip to Konya

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Istanbul Contemporary Cuisine
Changes on Work Permit
New Year
Turkey's TOP 10s
Summer-house
Anzac Day
İzmir Wild Life Park
Antalya State Opera and Ballet - March
Izmir State Opera and Ballet - March
Registration of Canadians Abroad
News From The Expat Harem
Latest Amendments in Land Registry Law


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