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We will send regular newsletters to our members who have signed up for receiving it during the registration. In 'mymerhaba' newsletter, our editorial staff provides updates, with regard to any information related to places worth visiting, viewing, or otherwise worth knowing, for those who care to know more....

Kathy from Izmit

Photo by Izmit Municipality
Interview with Kathy Mescall

- Tell us a little bit about yourself...
I'm 55 years old, though I certainly don't feel it. I always say that I'm at that difficult stage in life - too old to be young, but too young to be old. I'm divorced, I have two grown up children, both married and living abroad; a son who lives with his wife and two children in Australia, and a daughter who lives with her husband and four children in Israel. I'm a Business Development Manager and I also have a certificate in T.E.S.O.L - so I can always fall back on teaching if I haven't got a regular job; which isn't to say that teaching isn't a regular job, it just isn't my first choice of a career.

I love animals, especially cats and dogs. I had a street cat for over a year. He came to me when he was just 7 weeks old. His name was Thomas. He was run over outside my house about 18 months ago - I still miss him. I have written quite a few stories, which feature Thomas as the writer - I may share them with you later on. I wrote them for my grand children. I've also had a dog, Tom. I found him in the roadside when he was just two weeks old. I nursed him and fed him by hand until he was about 7 weeks old. His eyes weren't even open and he didn't have any teeth when I found him. I used to take him to work with me every day - he lived in a basket under my desk. My boss wasn't exactly thrilled, but being a 'crazy foreigner' he endured it. When he got too big to stay in my room, and because he used to prevent anyone from coming in to see me, especially my boss, who for some reason he hated, I had a kennel built for him and he lived on our office site. He came to sit with me every day and always ate his meals with me. I really loved him. Unfortunately, when I left the company, and before I had had time to make any arrangements for him, he wondered off and has never been seen again. I spent weeks on the roads looking for him.

It upsets me to think of what may have happened to him. He was just a wild dog to everyone else, but to me he was a real friend. He may have been wild but for the first year of his life he knew only love and kindness; I always hate to think of him being lost, cold and miserable. Anyway, that's enough of that subject.

I'm a Christian but I've read the Koran several times. My daughter became a Muslim about ten years ago, so I wanted to learn all about her religion, which I find very interesting

I live alone and have forgotten what male company is like - on a personal level that is.

- What made you come to Turkey?
About 9 years ago my family were hosts to a Turkish businessman who had come to the U.K to learn English. He stayed with us for 3 months. After he left we kept in touch, then, later on he brought two of his children over. They stayed with me for two weeks. Our two families became friends and I was invited to their home to participate in family occasions.

About 6 years ago, just after the death of my mother, I decided that I would like to live outside of the U.K so I went to a language school, studied for my TESOL certificate, so I could always find employment, and then decided to go to Russia. However my Turkish friends had other ideas and persuaded me that Türkiye would be better for me as they could 'protect me' My children also thought it was a better idea, especially my son, who was worried about me being alone in a foreign country - sons are like that. Anyway, I came to Türkiye, to Izmit. I've been here ever since.

- Can you compare your first years here with today?
I had been to Türkiye for holidays - to tourist resorts, Izmir, Çesme and Istanbul and had even visited Izmit twice before, even so, it was a huge cultural shock - especially as a strong, quite outspoken and very independent woman.

Izmit, at that time was quite a dirty place, not from rubbish or litter, but from all the muddy roads - there weren't any pavements. It was always incredibly dusty. It never ceased to amaze me how Turkish women kept their windows and curtains so clean and bright - and the washing, rows and rows of brilliant white washing: they would have put many Europeans to shame. I lived on the main road in the city center. We had a rail-track running along the whole length of the road, it divided the city in two. It was excellent. I can't describe it to you. I felt that I was living in a different dimension. Old and modern mixed together in perfect harmony. I remember one morning, waking very early to the sound of the first call to prayer. The sky was all shades of red and gray, with just a glimmer of light, down below my balcony I could see a parked car, a Mercedes: there was a bedraggled looking horse dragging an old cart with an ancient woman dozing in the driver's seat. I could see across to the Marmara Sea where several small boats, probably fishing boats, were returning to shore. And the train line, that wonderful, comforting train line that made my apartment shake every time a train trundled through. Listening to the haunting voice of the Imam calling across the sleeping city and looking out at all these different modes of transport, roads with no pavements, green trees swaying in the gentle breeze, I fell in love with the city and fell as though I was truly at home.

Of course after the devastating impact of the earthquake, which was the most terrifying experience of my life, life in Izmit changed. There was so much devastation - so much death and destruction everywhere. Yet in the worst of times, there's always some good. Izmit, with true courage and pride, stood up, shook itself down, and started all over again. I know very little about politics in Türkiye, and would never dream of criticizing what I don't understand. However, what the city planners have achieved in Izmit is absolutely amazing. Gone is the mangled railway line - utterly destroyed in the earthquake, in its place is a very European boulevard.

Destroyed homes have, for the most part, been torn down and new buildings erected. We have beautiful new roads and pavements, new trees have been planted everywhere: the city, which is basically industrial, has a new lease of life; it is vibrant and alive. I love it here. I love the people; don't you think that Turks are the most hospitable people in the world? I love the culture, I love the traditions, I love the respectful way people treat each other; I love the courage and fortitude of the Turkish people; I love their strength and their dignity.

- Has living in Turkey influenced your approach to life?
Most certainly. I have found a peace in Türkiye that I have never encountered in any other country. I always think that Turks, who are almost all Muslim, live a far more Christian life than Christians.

I have learned to become far more tolerant and don't look on life in such a materialistic way as I once did. Living through an earthquake soon made me realise what is truly important in life, and it isn't things. Of course life isn't perfect; there are plenty of times when I want to scream from the rooftops at the top of my voice. The yavas, yavas mentality (slowly, slowly) drives me crazy, but I wouldn't really want to change anything -it's all part of why I love it here.

Izmit is still small enough to be like a neighborhood, at least that's how it feels to me. Everywhere I go people know me and I always get wonderful service-wonderful.

When I leave Türkiye, albeit for business of for a holiday, I always feel as though I am leaving part of me behind. When I return, I feel whole again. There is no sight in the world like the view from the Bosphorous Bridge - day or night, whatever the season, it's magical.

- Turkish language?
I'm ashamed to say that even after 6 years, I can't string a decent sentence together. Is it a handicap? Sometimes but not often. I have lots of friends, and shopkeepers are always delighted to serve me - every one wants to practice their English. Why haven't I learned? Mainly because of the work that I do. Shortly after arriving in Izmit, my friend persuaded me to work for him; he owns a thriving electrical & mechanical installation company - EREL Electrotechnics- I was developing his international business, procuring materials from abroad, preparing documents in English, teaching his engineers English, entertaining foreign business men, visiting international companies in Istanbul and Ankara, writing company publicity in English, preparing and presenting bids for projects that were in English, so there was little time left for learning Turkish (goodness, I feel as though I am writing my CV) I worked at EREL for over 5 years, then I taught English for a few months, and now I'm working in a company that is developing plans to open a Water Ski Park at Sapanca lake, so again, it's my English and business skills that are needed, far more than Turkish. However, I will have to make a very serious effort to learn in the very near future as I want to apply for citizenship; part of the criteria is that I must be able to conduct my interview in Turkish.

- Let's talk about Izmit Region ?
Haven't I covered this already? I am not a lover of big cities and not a great socialiser. I don't feel the need to be among other 'foreigners'. In fact, most, though not all, of the British people that I have met since I've been here have been so negative; I prefer not to be with them. I find it difficult to understand how people, especially the brits, can go to a foreign country and expect to find everything English. I was with a British couple at a restaurant in Masukiye a few years ago; neither could speak any Turkish at all. They were most put out that the waiters couldn't speak
English and compensated by ordering their food in voices at least three decibels higher than normal - you know, in the way that some unenlightened people try to communicate with people who are hearing impaired, or even in a wheelchair; they speak in very loud patronising voices - I hate it.

Why am I still in Izmit? It's my home: After the earthquake, watching the city being reborn, watching the people trying to put some semblance of order back in to their lives, watching people coping with grief that I couldn't even begin to comprehend - imagine your whole family being wiped out before your very eyes. Well, that was when I realised that I was watching the rebirth of a city that I was part of, that I truly identified with. I had lived through the horror, I had been part of the horror, I shared experiences with the people if Izmit that has made me part of this city in a way that no other city in the world will ever be able to take me away from.

- What do you do in your daily life?
Work. I'm a workaholic. I eat out at restaurants at least twice a week. Old students visit me quite regularly. I like to go walking, I like to read, and I enjoy writing short stories. My younger friends often take me to a bar to listen to some mind blowing heavy rock music. I have a good life and I am extremely lucky in that I have lots of very handsome young men to act as my escort whenever I want to go somewhere. You know the customs and traditions in Türkiye are very different to European customs, and, though Izmit is quite modern, it still holds many old fashioned views. It's still frowned upon for women to be out without a male escort at night. I once asked a friend of mine to accompany me to a restaurant- I thought it would be a nice way to spend an evening together. She turned up at the restaurant with her husband and two children - perfectly normal for her, but it completely threw me. I would be viewed with great suspicion if I was to go out, platonically, with older men; women just don't have one to one friendships with men - it's unheard of (especially in my generation) So I have the very good fortune to always be in the company of young men; it does wonders for my ego, we have excellent friendships, they can discuss things with me (being an older woman, who is also foreign), that they couldn't discuss with their own mothers or aunts. As a mother of a grown up son, I can identify with them and, because I am not so involved with them, my advice is quite impartial. I can understand a young man's hopes and dreams, but can also very much appreciate his mother's worries and concerns.

- Family?
As I have already mentioned, my son, who is 34, lives in Australia; he's got two children and two stepchildren from his wife's former marriage.

He's been in Australia for 8 years. I've only seen him twice in that time, once when he got married and once just after the earthquake; he was desperately worried about me, especially as we were unable to make contact for three days: he had actually purchased a ticket to fly to Türkiye, thinking that he was going to be joining thousand of other bereaved relatives in digging the bodies of their loved ones from the rubble. My boss was the first one to make contact with him and then he immediately took me to Istanbul to obtain a visa and then took me directly to the airport, in the clothes that I stood up in (I had worn them for 3 days) he paid for my ticket and gave me $500 for the journey - a good friend and a very good man.

Anyway, Stephen, my son, is very happy; he has a great life and family - and my daughter-in law really loves me - because I live so far away! I'm the best mother-in-law a girl could have - she always tells me so. Her name is Moray and I love her dearly; she has made my son a very happy young man.

My daughter Karen will be thirty, next month. She went to Israel when she was 18. She worked on a kibbutz for 6 months, but never really returned. She met Mohamed, her husband. Within 2 weeks of returning from her stint at the Kibbutz, she had secured a nanny position advertised in the Lady magazine and was on her way back to Israel.

She, her husband and 4 children live on a farm. Her life is incredibly hard, but she loves it and never ever complains about anything. She is my pride and joy. Whenever I see her I get this immense feeling of pride. She is a dream daughter, her husband idolizes her and she adores him. She converted to the Muslim religion because she chose to; not because of any pressure from her husband (who is quite relaxed and modern in his views). She prays 5 times a day, covers her head at all times (which I personally hate) but teaches her children both religions. When Rhianne, my first grand child was born, Mohamed agreed for her to be christened, as a mark of love and respect for me. He promised this before she was born, before he knew if the baby was male or female. I love him very much - he's a very good man.

So, we are an international family.

I have brothers and sisters back in the U.K but both my parents are dead. my father died when I was only 6 years old, and my mother died 7 years ago - so, technically I'm an orphan!

- Have you traveled a lot in Turkey? Tell us your discoveries
Nowhere near as much as I would like to. I've been to Ephesus, Kusadasi, Amasra, Fethiye, Bolu, Abant (a magical place), Ankara, Istanbul and all the provinces around Izmit. Masukiye and Sapanca are still my favourite places.

People in the outlying villages live a very different life to city dwellers; it's like stepping back in time. Watching people work their land using the most archaic tools, taking their cows for a walk, tethered to long ropes. Village life is particularly hard for women; they do all the work and the men sit around khave houses, putting the world to rights. Villagers are extremely hospitable and really do believe that foreign visitors are a blessing from Allah. Not all villages are the same; some are richer than others, some are prettier than others, some are bigger than others, but they all have one thing in common - hospitality and friendship

- What is your preferred characteristic trait of Turks?
There are so may. Genuine friendship, genuine hospitality, and the way every one always rallies around to help each other; people will share their last loaf of bread with you if you are hungry. I love their love of God. I love the way that God is still so very much part of their daily lives. I love the way that they give thanks for their blessings instead of dwelling on what they haven't got. I love the way that even the most basic and primitive of homes is always kept spotlessly clean; Turkish people are very nationalistic; they have great pride in their country and in their flag. I love their pride in Ataturk, one of the greatest visionaries of the 20th century.

- What was the annoying one?
Only one? I hate the yavas, yavas mentality, it really irritates me. I don't like the way things don't seem to have moved on from Ataturk's time: Türkiye needs another hero. I truly hate the way people are dismissive of my city, but this isn't a Turkish problem -it's a foreign perception problem. I loathe and detest the small but highly visible groups of men who stand on street corners or sit in cafes or bars, just to ogle women. I hate they way they assume if a woman is on her own, she must be fair game. The worst of it is that these men are usually married to women who are covered; no one can look at their wives but they can leer of everyone else's.

- Turkish Cuisine?
I love it. I very rarely cook British food. My only problem is that I absolutely hate milk, yogurt and goats cheese. When I first arrived here, I ate with my eyes - I rejected most things because they didn't 'look nice'' what a fool I was. Now I eat with everything - that's why I'm constantly battling with my weight.

- Any suggestion to new comers to Turkey?
Don't expect Türkiye to be like your own country. You are a guest in this country, act accordingly. It's so easy to be negative, always look on the bright side of a situation; don't expect things to happen in a day, even a week, or a month, especially when dealing with red tape. Try to learn a few words of greeting; locals really do appreciate the effort.

Learn some local customs and traditions - it really helps and will save you lots of embarrassment. Please don't forget that you represent your own country while you are here. People will judge your society on your behavior. Relax and have a great time.

- Any suggestion to people planning to visit Izmit region...
It's the best decision you will make: Once you have decided to visit here, contact me, I'd be delighted to show you around my city. We have an excellent water ski school here and loads of other attractions - come and see.





Lisa from Kadıköy
Aaron from Çekmeköy
Adrian from Istanbul
Agnes from Gümüşlük
Aida from Nisantaşı
Aisha from Istanbul
Amanda from Bursa
Andy from Izmir
Anke from Kemerburgaz
Antonina from Bulgaria
Arlene's Secret Paradise
Ashley from Kadıköy
Borahan from Taksim
Bruno from Datça
Brandts from Holland
Carmel from Bursa
Carole from Kalkan
Caroline from Kuzguncuk
Claire from Izmir
Claudia from Fenerbahce
Cornelia from Florya
Cumali from Adana
Cyrus from Istanbul
Dace from Ankara
David from Van
Dmitri from Beşiktaş
Filiz from Beyoğlu
Fred from Adana
Frederic from Ankara
Hana from Istanbul
Harry from Antalya
Iben from Alanya
Ingrid from Tesvikiye
Isa from Istanbul
Jan from Kuşadası
Jane from Manavgat
Janine from Izmir
Jennifer from Istanbul
Jennifer from Sultanahmet
John from the Bosphorus
Kathy from Izmit
Kayla from Bostancı
Kenya from Beyoğlu
Leela from Nisantasi
Lisa from Sydney
Marc from Kosuyolu
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Maya from Izmir
Michelle from Göztepe
Molly from Galata
Nilgün from Suadiye
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Omar from Umraniye
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Pat from Yaniklar
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Latest comments about this article

 By songulfacey  17.12.2012

Hi Kathy! I was just trying to find an english speaker nanny or supporter for me and my daughter Ella and found your article here. I am 37 years old Turkish and have a 4 years old English daugher who speaks Turkish and a bit English. I would like to offer a job to someone who is interested living in. We live in Çenesuyu, in 3 bedroom flat and have a double room for a native candidate who wants to be a part of our single family. My number is 05548318690 my email : [email protected]

 By doculife  19.5.2007

Kathy, You are an excellent writer...I have lived in Istanbul now for five months, and am prepping to head out into the countryside and coast when my cousin arrives next week. Izmir keeps coming up when I ask about where to go, and also Cesme. Did you mean it when you said if we visit you will show us around? I am near your age and also have 2 grown children living abroad. I´d love to meet you...My email is [email protected] And yours? Robin

 By stephsecrist  3.7.2006

Kathy, what a wonderful take you have on Izmit. I just returned from a 2 week visit last night. My fiance lives in Uzuntarla and I am considering moving to Turkey with my two children. I would love to get your opinoin. My email is [email protected] Thanks for you time.

 By aylin22  28.1.2006

sorry Kathy it is Aylin again my email address is [email protected] thankyou x

 By aylin22  28.1.2006

Hi Kathy I have been with my boyfriend for 6 years now and he is from Izmit and lives in Kurucesme where you live! I am going to be doing my TEFL course in Istanbul and then moving to Izmit, I was wondering what job opportunities there are for me in Izmit. I would love to do teaching there but would also like to work in an office, I am fluent in Turkish and English and I was wondering whether you knew of any office jobs which were english speaking? Thankyou so much Aylin

 By airlineguy  25.12.2005

hi kathy my gf is from izmit.i have even been wlaked through those places u told me.would like to talk to you.pls pls drop a line at [email protected]

 By assie5  10.2.2005

Hello Kathy, Because my firm likes to send me to Izmit to start-up a little production unit in august 2005 i was looking around on the internet an found your amazing interview.I will stay at Izmit for at least a half year. I like to give you my emailadresse so you can send me yours.I have a lot of questions about the region ,the people and how to work with these people with respect. Mymailadress:[email protected] I hope you will answer this request so you learn me a lot of living there. regards, Wim

 By anna  27.8.2004

Hi Kathy! Thanks for writing a great article. I am so very proud to see ”guests” to my homeland happy. Unfortunately Turkey cops some really bad flak from the ”rest of the world” everyone I come across always asks me if we have supermarkets, in Turkey! and that “ I don’t look like a Turk (What ever a Turk is suppose to like I still haven’t worked that one out yet) Do we have Toilet paper!!! I mean Geeeeez guys, gives a break. We have great supermarkets and shopping centres and cars, planes, trains etc. And as far as Midnight Express goes - what has that movie done for Turkey? The propaganda is amazing. “Us Turks” are genuine, hospitable, generous, and if I may say so, more than most other countries. But everyone has their good & bad. So to everyone all over the world FORGET MIDNIGHT EXPRESS, Turbans & Swords and Camels and Sand. We may be geographically located in that part of the world, but believe me there is only 1 Turkey, YOU WILL LOVE IT. I live in Australia. I have lived here since I was 5 years old; I am now 38years old. I still encounter some racist remarks, and stupid questions about ”how come I don’t wear a veil” or ”Aren´t you glad to be living in Australia rather than Turkey, cause it must be difficult there with no roads, electricity & Supermarket!!)And I am suppose to be living in a WESTERN modern well educated country, yet I am asked these questions by adults & not little kids. I am at a stage in my life now that I will in the next year or so move back to Turkey for good. I feel I am slowly wasting away in Australia; it is such a slow country and very behind in technology, fashion & obviously EDUCATION. I would love to hear from more people living in Turkey and your stories, please write me. Best wishes to all A.

 By Tydie  13.7.2004

Hi, my name is Tydie and my family and I have been living in Mahsukiye since May. I haven´t really met many people since I have been here because I am finding the language very difficult. I am trying though. My email address is [email protected] and I would love to hear from anyone that has some advice for me! Thank you, Tydie

 By dympna  30.3.2004

My email, Kathy, is [email protected] A Brit by birth, an Irish Lass by heart, who grew up predominantly in Canada. would love to hear from you

 By dympna  30.3.2004

Hello Kathy, I was pleased to know there is an English lady living in Izmit. I have visited twice staying with my friend there. I am considering moving there and giving it a try for a year. I love Turkey and the people too. Nice to know there is some one to chat with now and then and share a good cuppa.

 By dave  28.3.2004

Shucks, forgot to give email... [email protected]

 By dave  28.3.2004

Hi Kathy..I´m an American working on developing a business in antalya. Would like feedback from you. pls email me at your convenience.

 By Aisha Thornton  8.3.2004

Dear Kathy, I was wondering if I could have an email to write to you at. I am a Pakistani national who has to give birth in Izmit as my husband is working at the Philips and Richards, Avrupa Insankynakleri School. He is Canadian and his name is David Thornton. I am traveling to Turkey so that my child´s Canadian citizenship is done easily as in Pakistan involves some documents form the local government which are a huge hassle to obtain. I wanted to know fi I could meet u in Izmit and if you could tell me the cheapest hospital in Izmit to give birth at and how much it would cost. I would be very grateful to you. My email is [email protected] Do write back or reply here if you can. Cheers, Aisha.

 By Luis from Colombia  14.1.2004

I have been living in Izmit, in Kurucesme for the last 8 months, and I have travelled around Turkey but not Sapanca or Masukiye. Now I know I have to check them out! Thanks for the article. Luis

 By etty  7.1.2004

I enjoyed the article very much and agre with everything you said about the turkish people. I´ve been on holiday numerous times and I am going to spend next summer in Altinkum, with my husband. He has asthma and has found Altinkum most suitable. Thank you again for some very intresting reading

 By Kathy  30.12.2003

Hi Karen Thanks for your comments - I am very sure that you will like Izmit, it isn´t Istanbul, but there really is quite a lot to do. If I can help you in anyway at all, do please get in touch with me. My mobile number is 0532 813 1838 Regards Kathy

 By karen  13.11.2003

i am moving to izmit within the next year to be with my future husband who has lives in izmit your article has given me an insit of what to expect my life to be. it is quite different being a tourist to being a resident i am greatly looking forward to seeing izmit for the first time. i have visisted turkey for the last 11 yrs but never izmit thank you for the over view

 By Ruth  13.10.2003

Your interview was such a delight to read and you really made me want to visit Izmit ( and believe me in all these years I have NEVER wanted to visit Izmit . You have a fantastic positive attitude and if you are ever in Cappadocia I would love you to be my guest . Best Wishes , Ruth

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Interviews with Members
Lisa from Kadıköy
Aaron from Çekmeköy
Adrian from Istanbul
Agnes from Gümüşlük
Aida from Nisantaşı
Aisha from Istanbul
Amanda from Bursa
Andy from Izmir
Anke from Kemerburgaz
Antonina from Bulgaria
Arlene's Secret Paradise
Ashley from Kadıköy
Borahan from Taksim
Bruno from Datça
Brandts from Holland
Carmel from Bursa
Carole from Kalkan
Caroline from Kuzguncuk
Claire from Izmir
Claudia from Fenerbahce
Cornelia from Florya
Cumali from Adana
Cyrus from Istanbul
Dace from Ankara
David from Van
Dmitri from Beşiktaş
Filiz from Beyoğlu
Fred from Adana
Frederic from Ankara
Hana from Istanbul
Harry from Antalya
Iben from Alanya
Ingrid from Tesvikiye
Isa from Istanbul
Jan from Kuşadası
Jane from Manavgat
Janine from Izmir
Jennifer from Istanbul
Jennifer from Sultanahmet
John from the Bosphorus
Kathy from Izmit
Kayla from Bostancı
Kenya from Beyoğlu
Leela from Nisantasi
Lisa from Sydney
Marc from Kosuyolu
Maria from Moda
Maya from Izmir
Michelle from Göztepe
Molly from Galata
Nilgün from Suadiye
Omar from Ankara
Omar from Umraniye
Paolo from Beşiktaş
Pat from Göreme
Pat from Yaniklar
Patricia from Kartal
Patrick from Bodrum
Paul from Antalya
Pennie from Çengelköy
René from Izmit
Robbi from Dalyan
Rosalind from Alanya
Russ from Gebze
Ruth from Cappadocia
Sarah from Gundogan
Sarah from Sarıyer
Sarah from Sisli
Sophie from Istanbul
Susanne from Fethiye
Steve from Tarabya
Tara from Cengelköy
Trevor from Side
Winter from Australia

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Fred's Trip Logs
Bahar's Views on...
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From Members' Pen
Interviews with Members
Moms & Kids Corner
Pets with Dr. Demirel
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Events calendar
Valentine's Day
Istanbul Live
This Weekend in Istanbul
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Various Discoveries
Best of...
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Art & Culture in Ankara
For Kids - Istanbul
For Kids - Ankara
Hobbies Istanbul
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Sports
Biletix System
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Turkeywide

Sustainable Living Film Festival
Turkish Ruins
Mount Ararat Trek
Seeing the Truth
Filmmor 2017
XJAZZ Festival 2017
International Izmir Festival
The Flying Broom Festival
Gümüşlük Festival
Bodrum Music Festival
Bodrum Jazz Festival
Filmekimi 2017
In Other Cities
Baksı Museum
It´s Time to Take Pictures!!
Photo of the Month
Inside Out in Istanbul
Sand Sculpture Festival
Mandatory Health Insurance for Expats
Impossible Fairies - Out Now
Istanbul Contemporary Cuisine
Changes on Work Permit
New Year
Turkey's TOP 10s
Anzac Day
İzmir Wild Life Park
Antalya State Opera and Ballet - March
Izmir State Opera and Ballet - March
Registration of Canadians Abroad
News From The Expat Harem
Latest Amendments in Land Registry Law


Events Calendar

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