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We will send regular newsletters to our members who have signed up for receiving it during the registration. In 'mymerhaba' newsletter, our editorial staff provides updates, with regard to any information related to places worth visiting, viewing, or otherwise worth knowing, for those who care to know more....

Shopping in Sanliurfa

´╗┐We're traveling again with our good friends Jim and Chelly over this long Thanksgiving weekend. We've decided once more to visit Sanliurfa, this time simply to get away, but also to do some shopping in the old bazaar.

We begin this adventure at 8:15 as we leave the driveway and head for the autobahn. It's a cool morning as we turn onto the main highway toward Adana; we want to get on the autobahn at the newly-opened entry ramp. We're passing a field full of workers harvesting peanuts. There must be twenty yards of them piled two meters deep on tarps at the head of the field. On the horizon well beyond the fields are the mountains; they are completely blanketed with snow. From this distance, we only imagine how cold it must be up there.

The more fields we pass, the more farming activity we see this morning. There is a great deal of plowing and cultivation going on. We also see several fields of cotton being harvested; it's being picked by hand. I've seen large cotton picking combines or harvesters, but none today.

We've entered onto the autobahn now and the traffic is light. We're heading east so the sun is in our faces; it's up enough to be of little challenge though. We'd planed a little latter start to prevent the sun being directly in our eyes. There goes a police car with lights flashing, no sirens though. And, there goes a very official car followed by several more police vehicles. The car has a RED license plate, which immediately denotes the occupant as a high-placed government dignitary. They are traveling well above our speed and are quickly out of sight.

Well on our way now, we make the crest of a hill overlooking Osmaniye and we get a quick glimpse of the Mediterranean off to our right down in the valley. As we gaze forward our eyes fall on a vast valley floor carpeted with squares, triangles and rectangles of fields interspersed with villages. Osmaniye is a fairly large community off on our far right horizon; the other villages in sight are small and gracefully interrupt the farm landscape. The haze in the valley makes our view appear as though we were looking through a fog-covered camera lens; it doesn't detract from the awe I feel though, each time I crest this hillside. The landscape of rolling hills and valleys in this part of Turkey has a beauty that captures my appreciation for the people who make their living here. Off across this vast valley of farmland we see the tallest peak of sheer rock faces, looking like shards of broken glass stood on end, side by side and all lightly dusted in snow. It's also here that we can see our highway ahead; it stretches for miles down to the valley floor and up the mountain wall on the other side until it disappears into the folds of the landscape through the haze.

We've made our way across the valley and have come to the highway tunnels drilled through the mountains. I continue to be awed by the engineering required to create these four feats of man. I think as we traverse the interior of these mountain tunnels, as they raise and curve through solid rock and earth, how much thanks we owe to the manpower that forged these passages for us. A trip that must have taken six or eight hours over these mountains has been carved through them now, cutting the time by half or more. We note as we travel that tanker trucks are NOT allowed through the tunnels and must continue to take those long narrow roadways up and over the mountain.

We're currently making our way through the longest tunnel; this is three-lanes of curving rising asphalt with lighted walls and ceilings. There are lighted speed limit indicators and signal lights at intervals to warn of hazards, should they occur. Again, I ride here in total awe of how they came to be.

We're getting off the autobahn now just east of Gaziantep and will make the rest of the trip on two-lane road. There has been a great deal of roadwork done since we last came this way; the road surface has vastly improved. We come to a petrol station and make our first stop of the morning. This is obviously not a new facility and it's far larger than meets the eye from the road. The restrooms are adequate but much in need of professional help, both structurally and in sanitation.

We venture into the store area and find a multitude of wares; it would be a challenge to describe adequately the breath of products available here. Besides the various food and drink items it's a tiny, chaotic product-strewn department store. One item that caught our attention was a box with a cellophane window containing a baby boy that was anatomically correct in every way. Interesting too, the boy was dressed in a pink garment that did not cover him. I also might note here that China has fully come to rural Turkey as well; most everything we picked up was made there. Before leaving, Chelly has decided to buy a case of cherry juice drinks; there are twenty-seven little boxes in the case for $2.60.

Back on the road now, the fields stretching from our roadway to the horizon are dotted in olive trees. There are trees in every direction as far as we can see. In no time we reach the small village of Nizip where much olive oil is produced. Then we enter and leave Dutlu, the village main street nearly the length of this sentence; it comes and it's gone.

We're beginning our descent into the Euphrates River valley and the city of Birecik. The river is fairly wide here, and we cross the bridge into the main city center of Birecik, the Turkish home of the famous Bald Ibis bird. These birds used to be very plentiful here in Turkey but have gone nearly extinct. With specially directed conservation efforts, the Bald Ibis is making a measured come back; there are none here now as they migrate to Egypt during the winter months. We pass a monument of the bird as we climb out of the city and continue toward Sanliurfa. Our day has been beautiful, the sky is blue and the temperature must be in the sixties. Our landscape has taking a turn here toward rock-strewn barrenness. Farming can still be seen to some degree but one has to wonder just how a crop can be grown through all these rocks! Even the small areas of cultivated ground are so rocky it hard to imagine the harvest being very large. There are a good many flocks of sheep on our roadsides and a number of goats as well. It certainly seems the landscape is more suited for sheep and goats but again the grazing must be tough. These flocks and herds must venture miles in an effort to forage adequately.
Our venture has come to a near standstill as we're climbing again but this time behind a large string of traffic and the lead is a very large truck that is making no time. I notice our speed is fluctuating between 2 and 5 mph. There are some true frustrations in traveling these two-lane roads. In this situation, the travel becomes very dangerous because many drivers do not choose to go with the flow of traffic. Many will simply pull into the other lane to pass; this is done on blind curves and on hills, with little regard for what might be coming just over the hill or around that next bend.

There it is--Sanliurfa in the valley below. We begin our graceful decent into the city of our goal. We pass a sign indicating Sanliurfa contains 400,000 folks; this is a community of some renown. The literature tells us that the founding was just after the flood of Noah's time. It's called the city of prophets: Abraham, Job, Elija, Noah, Moses, Jacob and Lot all played a role here in the ancient past. It's most notable prophet is Abraham and much is made of his life here; he was born in a cave here and moved a short distance away to live in Harran. Lot was also born here and joined Abraham to go to Sodom. This too is where the famous pool of fish created by God is found. According to legend, Abraham's preaching caused him to run afoul of King Nimrod and he was to be cast into a raging fire. But God intervened and turned the flames to water and the logs to fish, saving the prophet. There are two columns on the hilltop, above the cave where Abraham is reported to have been born, that were used as the catapult to fling Abraham into the flames. The fish in the pool nearby the cave are considered sacred and can not be fished.

We get to our hotel, the 'Harran', at 12:30 and get our bags taken to our rooms. We discover also, that the van will be in the basement-parking garage. We take a little time to hang up our things and freshen up. Our room has two beds, a wall unit for clothes, a desk/vanity with a small hidden refrigerator and a table with two chairs. The room heat is a little overwhelming but there's an air conditioner so if it gets to be too much, I'll turn on the air. These rooms are not thermostatic controlled, you either have heat or you don't. Our view is across the cityscape. We meet Jim and Chelly in the lobby and we go out in search of lunch. We're walking through a narrow alleyway just across from our hotel and a young gentleman greets us kindly and asks us into his small caf├ę, Asmali Konak. We accept his invitation and enjoy a great meal.

After lunch we begin our exploration of the city, looking specifically for the old bazaar. To my recollection, it's only a few blocks away in this direction. Keep in mind I've never been there and the last time I was in this city was more than a year ago. I had the direction correct, however the distance was far more than a 'few' blocks, as it turned it to be ten or so. We happened on it more by luck than anything else; we did ask a few folks to point us in the right direction but it seemed the more help we got, the more confused we were.

We wade into the first cavernous alleyway we came to, swimming through a mass of humanity and listening to the waves of conversation melt into the walls of clothing and shoes that greet us. There were belts hung in clumps of dozens above each shopkeeper's table. There were pairs of shoes hung ten and fifteen to a rope from floor to ceiling. Every item for sale was piled across the makeshift tables cascading toward the aisles we were moving slowly into. No matter which direction we turned, the breath of commerce was endless. Not far inside we encountered passages leading off to our right and left. We journeyed straight ahead looking both ways and people watching at the same time. We were consumed by the rush of shoppers moving through the bazaar. Here's a shop selling gold jewelry and there's one selling fabric, another selling scarves and yet another selling machine made carpets.

As we near the sun-drenched exit from this passage we direct our attention to the alley on our left; it's one long corridor of gold shops. We make the turn and walk the length of the gold passage. The gold in these windows is the kind of gold we do not see at home, most is 22 karat and very fine quality workmanship. None of these shops are as large as a walk-in closet but the wealth of gold in each is staggering. We don't linger in any one place long though before being badgered by beggar women. These women mill about with a child in their arms holding out a shoe box lid pleading for coins to buy bread for their sick or hungry child. There is even the occasional child of five or seven, boy or girl with their hand out stretched using one of their few works of English, 'money, money, money' they chime. Some are quite persistent but others move on when ignored or firmly confronted. Most are more nuisance then needy; Turks suffer beggars with little tolerance, anyone seen as able bodied is admonished to get a job.

We've crossed into the larger central hall of the bazaar and Carol and Chelly are stopping at every other table looking at fabric and shawls. Jim and I simply muse at the ladies' choices of shopping fare, since all these things can be seen and purchased in Adana at one shop or another. Jim and I slip out into the courtyard where tea is being served, I mention to Jim that there doesn't appear to be a single woman at any of the tables. We decide that our ladies should not join us out here either. As I turn to reenter the shopping area I catch the glimpse of a merchant up against a pillar with a small glass case filled with old pocket watches. I feel I must take a look; I review several beautiful antique pieces from Constantinople. These are vintage key wind watches. I believe the gentleman has tagged me as someone with money however because no watch goes for less than $300! And the few I look at don't even work! They also very much reflect their age and use over the past 100 years. A number of them are near pure silver and the price is justified simply by that fact; however at $300 I would expect the watch to tell time. I thank the man for indulging me and slip away into the crowds within.

On entry back inside I see the ladies have not lost interest in their pursuits; they're still wrangling over shawls with one of the merchants. Jim slipped away while I was lost in the watch merchant's case and when I search the crowd for him I spy him entering the large hall from another passage. As he nears my position, he tells me he has found the carpet merchants, that is, the handmade carpet shops.

We get the ladies attention and tell them what we have in mind and they join us for the trek to the carpet passageway. We find a number of alcoves down this very narrow aisle-way stuffed with stacks of carpets and kilims. Carol and I stop at one with an older man sitting in a cramped carpet cocoon. The alcoves are literally six or eight feet across and maybe ten or twelve feet deep and just as high with an arched ceiling. The shopkeeper we stop to talk with has to throw his pieces at his feet and we can see only part of what he displays for us because his space is simply far too small for the pieces he wants us to see. After twenty or thirty minutes we decide to take a couple of his pieces to the sunshine outdoors; it's impossible to buy a carpet or kilim in poor lighting. He has no problem with us taking our selections to the outside for review under the sun. We're not followed nor even bothered as we take these pieces for a look in the sun; this guy has NO idea we'll be back with his pieces, it simple trust on his part.

Carol and I talk it over in the light of day and decide both of these pieces are very rich in color and character, show no repair and should be ours; we return and pay the man our agreed price. We've bought a small saddlebag and a small gigym kilim. We exchange our thanks and bid the gentleman good evening. Just down a couple alcoves on the opposite side, Jim and Chelly have been viewing pieces in a gentleman's shop they've bought from before. Carol and I settle at another little alcove beside them where we look over more pieces offered up by this new man next door. We don't spend much time here though; it's getting late and we're tired and want to get back to the hotel and prepare for dinner.

Chelly is pretty tired by now and we get her a cab; she will ride back to the hotel with our treasures. Jim, Carol and I will walk back taking a different route than we did coming earlier in the day. The walk is very much up hill most of the way back and we seem to be on a street filled with tailor shops. Our walk is interrupted little as we see nothing of real interest and move along routinely. Jim stopped briefly to get Chelly a Coke, rare here as Pepsi has taken the lead in sales in this region of Turkey.

Back at the hotel now, we suggest to Jim a short rest is in order and afterward we'll go out for dinner. We've seen a restaurant just across from our hotel and decide to give it a try. There's a gentleman at the entry door eager to have us come in, he's very pleased to accommodate us and another young man motions for us to follow him to our seats. Once settled he takes our drink orders and we indicate we'd like to look at the meal selections we passed on the way into the dining room. We look into the warming table trays and each order a stew like dish of baked meat and vegetables. I order two different types, everyone else only one. After I finish the two I order once more one of the dishes I have to start with. The food was delicious!

After dinner we decide we need desert and make our way back toward the hotel where several little sweet shops are located. We all get the treat of our choice and tea then return to the hotel, we've had a full day.

The next day opens beautifully, sunshine and blue skies. I'm sitting here looking out of our room window; just across the way is a roof blanketed with pigeons. There's also a new ten story building in the final phases of completion across from our window; it's painted in yellow pastel and OD green accent. We're meeting Jim and Chelly for breakfast on the ground floor and make our way down. The dining room has a very large floor to ceiling bay window overlooking to pool; we settle at a table near the window and bask in the morning light. Just outside the window and across the pool are several domestic ducks parading up and down at poolside. One white duck appears to have met with an accident somewhere along the way, the poor thing has a gimp; waddle slump, waddle slump, waddle slump it follows the others in the parade.

Carol has filled her plate and off I go to follow suit; I begin with a large fresh bread bun, get some bologna-like meat, tomatoes, cucumbers and white cheese. I also get a cup of instant coffee. There are boiled eggs and scrambled eggs, fresh fruit and olives; I pass them all. This is a very lovely breakfast spread, as is the case in most of our travels. We're not fully engaged in our breakfast when Jim and Chelly appear at the door; they come over and join us. Once they have their plates together, we all settle in to enjoy the wonderful food and we begin to discuss the day ahead.

We decide we'll again return to the bazaar and we enjoy our breakfast in leisure. We are not the only people in the room; many business people have come in and hurried around and gone out again. It is a regular business day for these gentlemen and a leisurely breakfast isn't in their plan for the day. We admire several of the suits that we see this morning; I think I should be getting one before I leave the country. It seems though, every time I get a tailored suit I 'expand' out of it and don't wear it more than once or twice. Several of these gentlemen are attired in pin strips, mostly dark suits.

With breakfast finished we collect our things a get on with the day. We're walking to the bazaar once more but walking on the opposite side of the street from yesterday. On our way we happen by a little shop where a gentleman is making kunefay and Carol decides we should have a photo of the process. He's very kind and allows her the privilege. We walk on and leisurely gaze in one window after the other. At one point we come to a large open space and decide to cut through the block there to save time; oops, we get ourselves into a dead end and have to retreat. As we come out I see a narrow alleyway cutting through in another place and suggest we follow it; my suggestion is met with some skepticism but we press ahead. Several people have come out of the alleyway and I feel like it's a good bet it goes through. We don't go far until we are dumped out into the courtyard of the Ulu 'Great' Mosque. It's thought this Mosque was built between 1170 and 1175. Looking up from the courtyard we see a lovely clock tower; I find no literature to tell me about it. Also in the courtyard is a small cemetery containing twenty or so headstones from centuries past.

Just adjacent to our entry and down a few steps we find the exit to the street and leave the courtyard behind. We've come out into a small open-air bazaar; which is mostly clothing and a few shoes. We passed this corner yesterday on our walk back to the hotel so we know we aren't far from the entry to the large covered bazaar. We linger here just a few minutes as Carol and Chelly look at some clothes. I can't believe the weather today; this time of year it could be much colder here but today it's simply beautiful.

We finish our walk to the covered bazaar and investigate areas we did not see yesterday. There is little more to it that captures our attention, just more of the same. We linger a little bit in several gold shops and I buy a Turkish silver '2000 commemorative' coin about the size of a silver dollar. Carol buys more fabric for quilting and we migrate back to the carpet corridor. I had my eye on a pair of kilims yesterday and told the guy what I would pay but he wasn't interested. This morning I pass by once more offering my price and once more he isn't taking it. Jim and Chelly return to their man's alcove and get another little something and we press on with the day. Carol wants to look in one other alcove before we go and we do so; there's nothing there for us. We're out now on the walk and decided what to do next when a man come to me with an urgent plea to return. He is telling me the gentleman with the pair of kilims has decided to take my offer and I return to investigate. Sure enough the guy has decided my offer was sincere and packs the two beautiful pieces for me to take home. I thank him so much and he me in turn.

Back outside it is decided we will do lunch and we go to a caf├ę just across the street from the bazaar. Again, we make an excellent choice; the food is fast and it's great. Leaving the little caf├ę we decide to head back toward the hotel. But before heading back Chelly decides we need more of the snack buns she picked up earlier in the day. The little bakery is just down a few doors from where we stand. We discovered a very lovely simit, or at least that's what we're told it is. This pastry looks like a fairly flat cinnamon bun covered in sesame seeds; it's GREAT. I hope we can find the same thing in Adana. We slip down the walk and Chelly buys four more.

We cross back over to the covered bazaar and I want to buy some more roasted corn. I bought a little bit this morning to try and it's salted and roasted like nuts. We find the stand and I get a half-kilo for the walk back to the hotel. I think it must be field corn; it's very crunchy and quite tasty.

We take our time returning to the hotel, stopping every shop or two to gaze into the windows of gold. I spot a large gold coin in one window and have to enquire inside to check the cost. I had an idea and it's confirmed, a little more than I'm willing to part with today. Chelly is in pursuit of a bracelet that will fit her wrist; seems most are far too short and those that do fit are not comfortable. Here's an appliance store and Chelly says 'wait'; she's looking for a 220-volt coffeepot. We all go inside and Carol asks the salesman if there are any coffeepots. Sure enough, he leads us to the back of the store and Chelly gets her pot. The shop owner invites us for tea and we slip into the back showroom where they have cushioned benches placed around a small fountain. We learn that this building has been restored from a four hundred year old facility. We're sitting in a room with a very high vaulted ceiling; there's a large chandelier hanging down from a beautiful stained glass dome. Standing across the floor from our seating area are a number of new refrigerators and I find it very curious that a couple have the look of antique 'Frigidaire' refrigerators of my childhood. The smaller of the two is even off-white in color very much the same as those years ago. This little interlude in our walk has been lovely.

As we prepare to leave, we graciously thank our host and resume our walk. We've gone four or five more blocks now and come to a very nice open-air caf├ę, 'Kizilay' where the young man out front is asking us in. We've walked a good ways and decide to stop and accept his invitation. We're escorted to the rear of the outdoor covered courtyard and are seated. The sights, sounds and smells of this adventure are a great delight. We get refreshments and simply relax in the afternoon air. I notice just outside there's a police car sitting along the curb and note it has a web address painted across the back door, the 21st century is apparently alive and well even here in southeast Turkey. I probably shouldn't even say that because there are internet-cafes all over this country and I sure throughout the Middle East today.

While we're relaxing and enjoy each other's company the manager approaches our table and begs our indulgence as he asked us back this evening for dinner. He apologizes for his intrusion and is gone. Before we leave, we step into the enclosed restaurant area and check out the food case. We're introduced to all the entr├ęes available and again asked to join them for dinner. We gracefully retreat and tell them we'll consider returning later.

Back at the hotel now we have a tiny dilemma; we've been in search of a deck of cards most of the afternoon. The four of us decided we would play some 'wheel' before we retired for the night. Jim and Chelly don't know the game but it pretty easy to pick-up. Since we found no cards, we ask the desk clerk for assistance; he calls one of the staff over for consultation and he in turn asks a young lad to take me to the mall just down the block where I can get a deck of cards. Once again the assistance and eagerness to help us unconditionally says fathoms about Turkish hospitality.

I get the cards and return to the hotel and go up to the room to relax and freshen up before dinner. Carol and our friends have decided dinner will be at six and they decide we will return to Kizilay. In our room, I rearrange our purchases to, taking them from plastic bags and stowing them in our small carrying cases. I actually bought a small sports bag for our kilims and snack food for the trip home. We turn on the TV and watch the BBC news and check out a few other stations but find nothing in English except the news. Time marches on and we have to get down to the lobby to meet Jim and Chelly for dinner.

We walk the short distance to the Kizilay and we are greeted by the manager and immediately taken to the display case to order our meals. Jim and Carol have the local specialty, Urfa Kabob; Chelly and I have the lamb shish. The portions are very generous and the food is no disappointment. We very much enjoy our dinner and the service is superb. We pass on desert and leave to return to our hotel.

Once back at the hotel we join Jim and Chelly in their room for a few games of cards. Jim picks up the game with little difficulty and manages easily to best all of us three games running. We have a very good evening, agree to meet for breakfast at eight and retire for the night.

Our breakfast is very quiet, it's Saturday and most guests are not around at this hour. The whole time we see only three people in the dining room with us. We're in no hurry this morning; we've decided to go to the museum after eating and it doesn't open until 8:30. We awakened to another very lovely day and we intend to enjoy it. After we eat we retreat to our rooms to pack out things. I ask the desk to send someone up for our bags, we have five now; we came with only three.

The desk clerk makes calculations and presents us with our bills and we check out. The van is loaded with those things we just felt we couldn't live without and we head for the museum. We're not completely sure where it's located even though we have a superficial tourist map. We're hardly into the traffic pattern when we see a sign to point our way to the museum. We discover it's not all that far from our hotel; on a beautiful day like this we could have easily walked. As it turns out we're very pleased we did not walk because it's closed! Jim says this is his third attempt to see this museum and he decides there must be some reason he isn't supposed to; we have a laugh and decide to make our way out of the city. Since the day is so very young we decide we'll stop and do some shopping in Gaziantep.

We direct Jim out of the city center and he discovers we've led him to the circle where he can get petrol; from here it's an easy route out of the city. After taking on fuel we get back on the road. As we leave the city limits the highway begins a hard climb away from Sanliurfa. The landscape around us is fawn-brown and rather barren looking. The soil along here seems to lie in very sparse patches between the rocky out croppings. There's a dry riverbed to our right and below our road grade. There are a good number of trucks creeping up the hill but fortunately we have a clear passing lane and make the effort to get by as many vehicles as possible before we crest the hilltop. We are surrounded here by road construction as the crews dump and grade road building materials on either side of us. It obvious the future on this highway is to become four-lanes and it can't be too soon coming.

Once we level out over the crest of the mountain we've just climbed we're engulfed in the rock-strewn landscape again. This panorama outstretched before us reminds me of the photos we've seen of the Martian landscapes, the color is much the same as well. As we travel along, I notice and point out a man standing out a good distance from the road. He appears to be lost in another world all by himself out there and it brings to mind the phase; 'here's a man outstanding in his field'. HaHaHa, sorry, couldn't resist.

There's another picture of life in these parts; a couple of young fellows are out turning earth with a horse and plow. Not far now and we're again making our descent into Birecik and crossing the Euphrates River. Immediately across the river we pull into a service station and stop to stretch and use the restrooms. The air here is beautiful and cool with the river flowing gently by just below us. I slip into the little market and pickup a few more packages of cookies for our trip ahead. I'm afraid I'm addicted to Ulker brand products.

And now the roadside becomes blanketed with trees and there in two trees stand a couple of guys pruning, I think. None of these trees have a great plumage of branches so I'm assuming they're pruned to facilitate easier harvest. It seems amazing these tiny tree branches would hold guys up there like that. We talk about the trees and decide they have to be pistachio. We're closing in on Gaziantep and it's the center of pistachio production in Turkey so it stands to reason most of the vast rolling hills are covered in them.

There's the sign for Gaziantep; we're getting deeper into the city and we're looking for the sign to the city center. There's the stadium on our right so we need to make a left at the main intersection, and there's the castle on the hill to our left so we're very close to our goal. We begin looking for a place to park; this is a very serious challenge in any city in this country. We miss one good opportunity and make a complete loop around the city center and return to the parking garage we saw to begin with. After getting parked, we make our way to lunch; there's a very good restaurant across the block from where we parked. We enjoy a good lunch and relax for our trek ahead.

Carol and I discuss the route we'll take Jim and Chelly as we look for more fabric and other treasures. Chelly and Carol both want to find velvet material and so far we've found NONE! Chelly stops to buy some Gaziantep shoes and we move along. We're wondering through the narrow alleyways of the old shopping district. We've been through these alleys a time or two before. Chelly and Carol have gone their way and Jim and I ours; we're both very aware of each other's movements but we're in different shops along the route. Chelly has stopped and bought a copper 'punch' bowl at one of the shops; the rest of us have bought nothing.

Once we all gather together again I suggest we go on to the antique shop where Jim bought some stuff the last time we were in the city. After lingering there for a short time, I suggest a walk up the street to a carpet shop I saw as we were driving around the block. We walk to the shop and we've never been here before. We're greeted warmly and go inside to look around. The first thing that catches my eye is a Kars Kilim hanging on the wall. I pass it up and look at several piles of other pieces. The owner throws a number of beautiful kilims out for us to see and Carol finally points to the kilim on the wall I noted to start with and ask the guy if we can see it out in the sunshine. We took several pieces out into the sun-drenched day but purchased only the one I saw to start with.

Our shopping has got to come to a close it's late in the afternoon and we want to be on the autobahn before dark. As we're leaving the carpet shop Chelly admires a kilim hanging on the wall in the alleyway out to the sidewalk, the shop owner comes to talk about this selection and we find out the price and Chelly wants it. So it too gets packed and we thank the man and make our way toward the parking garage. Once we're at the van we put away our packages and get underway. We stop to pay the garage fee, about $1.85 cents for three hours.

Jim heads the van down the street and we make it to the autobahn in twenty minutes. The sun is quickly falling on our wonderful weekend away and we enjoy the rest of the trip home quietly.




Fred┬┤s Farewell
A Day Trip in January
Drive to Roman Ruins
An Autumn Drive
Cappadocia - Once Again
A Trip to Ephesus and Pamukkale
Fred┬┤s Tarsus
Northern Cyprus Over Thanksgiving
Cilician Drive
Kocatepe Mosque - Ankara
A Visit to An─▒tkabir
Fred┬┤s Weekend in Ankara
A Day in Anavarza
Driving in the Heartland
Spontaneity by Fred
A Trip to So─čanl─▒ and G├╝l┼čehir
An Antakya Weekend
A Weekend Around Adana
A Rainsoaked Adventure
A Mediterranean Adventure
Fred's Bor Adventure
Fred's Weekend Escape to Ihlara
Fred's Lecture on Carpet
Fred's Weekend Away
Uzuncaburc with Fred
Museums of Cappadocia
G├Âreme - A Different Way
Night Train to Ankara
Cave Home Tour
A Trip to Kayseri - ├ľzkonak
Kastabala in August
A Bittersweet Adventure
Silifke, Anamur and more
Around Adana
Catalhoyuk & Aksehir Adventures
Nigde Exploration
Cappadocia Again
Kahramanmara┼č Again
A Trip to Kayseri - Sultanhani
A Morning Walk
Sunday Lunch Overlooking the Lake
Fred's Kahramanmaras
Holiday Drive to Mersin
A Sunday Drive to Yumurtalik
Fred's Tarsus
Fred's Cappadocia
Botas Seaside Drive
Fred's Konya Museums
A Bus Tour to Antakya
A Walk with Cuddle
Ankara Again
Gaziantep Museum by Fred
Moores' Anniversary Weekend
Shopping in Sanliurfa
The Seaside at Karata┼č
This is Ankara
Tour to Gaziantep-Harran
Trip to Konya
Birsen's Horizons
Fred's Trip Logs
Bahar's Views on...
Business World
From Members' Pen
Interviews with Members
Moms & Kids Corner
Pets with Dr. Demirel
The archives of The Guide
The Archives of Turkishtime
Teen's world

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Silifke, Anamur and more
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Catalhoyuk & Aksehir Adventures
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Fred's Tarsus
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A Bus Tour to Antakya
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Focus On
Birsen's Horizons
Fred's Trip Logs
Bahar's Views on...
Business World
From Members' Pen
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Moms & Kids Corner
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The archives of The Guide
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Teen's world




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Turkeywide

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Filmmor 2017
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─░zmir Wild Life Park
Antalya State Opera and Ballet - March
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Registration of Canadians Abroad
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